Parliamentary Questions 2005-2007

 

5 February 2007

Waste Management

To ask the Scottish Executive how much has been allocated to (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire councils from the Strategic Waste Fund in each year since 2003.

Ross Finnie: The following table details the amounts allocated to Angus and Aberdeenshire Councils from the Strategic Waste Fund since 2003.

Year

Angus Council

(£)

Aberdeenshire Council

(£)

2002-03

0

550,000

2003-04

359,000

1,979,000

2004-05

1,706,000

2,242,000

2005-06

2,753,000

4,742,000

2006-07

1,284,065

6,367,000

2007-08

1,209,000

4,078,000

Indicative Awards from 2008-09 to 2020

13,730,000

35,292,000

Total (including indicative awards).

21,041,065

55,250,000


Breastfeeding

To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of mothers were recorded at their six to eight week review as breastfeeding in NHS Tayside and NHS Grampian in each year since 2000.

Lewis Macdonald: Centrally held information on pre-school child health surveillance reviews are derived from the Child Health Systems Project–Pre-School system (CHSP-PS). NHS Grampian do not participate in this system and therefore the requested information for NHS Grampian is not centrally available. Information for NHS Tayside is shown in the following table.

NHS Tayside – Breastfeeding at the Six to Eight Week Review by Year of Birth

 

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Number of Reviews1

3,647

3,690

3,491

3,731

3,718

3,795

Percentage Breastfed2

39.4

38.5

39.5

38.4

37.0

40.1

Source: ISD Scotland, CHSP-PS November 2006. Ref: IR2007-00255.

Notes:

1. Excludes reviews where breastfeeding information is not valid.

2. Exclusively breast-fed or fed mixed breast and bottle.


Minimum Wage

To ask the Scottish Executive what the latest annual estimate is of the number of people earning the national minimum wage or below in the (a) Angus, (b) Gordon, (c) West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine and (d) Banff and Buchan parliamentary constituencies.

Nicol Stephen : The preferred source for earnings estimates is the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, which is carried out by the Office for National Statistics.

Table 1 shows the estimated number of employees earning the national minimum wage or below in Angus, Gordon, West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine and Banff and Buchan parliamentary constituencies in 2006 (latest data).

The estimates in the table are based on a sample survey, and as such, are subject to sampling error.

Table 1 Number of People Earning the Minimum Wage or Below in Selected Parliamentary Constituencies, 2006

Constituency 2006
Angus

1600

Banff and Buchan

1000

Gordon

1700

West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine

600

Source: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, Office for National Statistics.

Notes:

1. The estimates are based on the hourly pay excluding overtime and shift premium payments.

2. The estimates are based on a sample survey, and as such, are subject to sampling error.

3. The estimates are based on place of residence.

4. Parliamentary constituencies based on 2005 revision.


Council Tax

To ask the Scottish Executive how many recipients of council tax benefit aged 60 or over there were in (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire local authority areas in each of the last three years for which the information is available, also showing what percentage of the over-60 age group they represented.

Tom McCabe: The data relating to recipients of council tax benefit are presented in terms of benefit units, which are based on households in receipt of council tax benefit and as a result may contain two or more persons (possibly one of whom may also be aged under 60). These data are reported in the following table.

Number of Benefit Units Containing One or More Persons Aged Over 60 Receiving Council Tax Benefit**

Local Authority

2004

2005

2006

Aberdeenshire

7,240

7,490

7,640

Angus

5,160

5,410

5,570

Note: **The data have been provided by the Department of Work and Pensions and relate to benefit units, not counts of persons. Figures include benefit units where there is a single person aged over 60, and benefit units containing two or more persons where at least one is aged over 60. Council tax benefit figures exclude any second adult rebate cases. The source is the Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit Management Information System quarterly caseload.

It is not appropriate to divide council tax benefit units by population figures for the over-60 age group, as these are on a different basis.


Student Finance

To ask the Scottish Executive how many students from low-income backgrounds in the (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire local authority areas have had their university fees paid in each year since 2002-03.

Nicol Stephen
: The following table highlights the number of fees paid by the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS) to students at higher education institutions from low-income backgrounds who were domiciled in the (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire local authority areas in each year since 2002-03:

Students from Low-Income Backgrounds who have had their University Fees Paid, by Local Authority Area

Academic Year

(a) Angus

(b) Aberdeenshire

2002-03

350

575

2003-04

320

625

2004-05

325

600

2005-06

350

625

For the purposes of this answer students are defined as being from "low-income" backgrounds if they have declared parental/spousal income details of not more than £17,500, which was the SAAS means-tested threshold in 2005-06 for receipt of full financial support through the Young Students Bursary (YSB). For comparable results over the period in question this threshold has been kept constant, even although the full YSB threshold has changed in this period.

Students who have not declared parental/spousal income details and those that are classed as exempt from parental contribution have not been included in the above table.


Employment

To ask the Scottish Executive how many graduates from (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire have returned to work in their local authority area in each of the last three years for which the information is available.

Nicol Stephen: The following table shows the number of graduates at post graduate, first degree or sub-degree level that were domiciled in (a) Angus, (b) Aberdeenshire before they started their course. To determine how many of them left their local authority area to study and then returned to work in their local authority area requires information on commuting which is not available centrally.

Number of Graduates from HEIs from Angus and Aberdeenshire

Domicile Prior to Study

(a) Angus

(b) Aberdeenshire

2002-03

745

1,630

2003-04

800

1,725

2004-05

780

1,955

Note: The table includes students graduating from a postgraduate or undergraduate course at a UK HEI (excluding the Open University). All numbers have been rounded to the nearest five.


Drug and Alcohol Misuse

To ask the Scottish Executive how much specific funding has been allocated for drug and alcohol treatment services in (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire in each year since 2003-04.

Cathy Jamieson: Funding is allocated to health boards for drug treatment and care services and to tackle alcohol problems. Angus falls within the boundaries of Tayside Health Board and Aberdeenshire falls within the boundaries of Grampian Health Board.

The following table sets out the funding that has been made available to Tayside and Grampian Health Boards for drug treatment and care services since 2003-04.

Health Board

2003-04

(£000)

2004-05

(£000)

2005-06

(£000)

2006-07

(£000)

Tayside

1,483

1,559

1,965

1,965

Grampian

1,314

1,963

2,202

2,202

Angus Council received £146,000 per annum over the period 2003-04 to 2004-05 to tackle drug misuse. Aberdeenshire Council received £302,000 per annum over the same period to tackle drug misuse.

The following table sets out the funding that has been made available to Tayside and Grampian Health Boards to tackle alcohol problems since 2004-05.

Health Board

2003-04

(£000)

2004-05

(£000)

2005-06

(£000)

2006-07

(£000)

Tayside

0

168

556

556

Grampian

0

212

699

699


Further and Higher Education

To ask the Scottish Executive what capital and revenue allocation has been made available to Angus College in each year since 2003-04.

Nicol Stephen: The Scottish Funding Council, and its predecessor the Scottish Further Education Funding Council, has been responsible for allocating funds to further education colleges during the period in question. The information requested for Angus College is as follows:

Year

Capital Grant

£

Revenue*

£

2003-04

638,015

7,681,468

2004-05

0

8,908,147

2005-06

0

9,205,875

2006-07

0

9,598,118

Note: *Includes recurrent grant-in-aid and non-project specific capital funding.


 

1 February 2005

 

Central Heating Programme

To ask the Scottish Executive how many council-owned houses in Angus are now centrally heated as a result of the Executive’s central heating programme.

Des McNulty: I have asked Angiolina Foster, Chief Executive of Communities Scotland to respond. Her response is as follows:

In the public sector Angus Council installed 261 central heating systems through the programme.


Scottish Executive Funding

To ask the Scottish Executive what dedicated funding has been made available to Angus and Aberdeenshire councils to tackle antisocial behaviour in each year since 2004-05.

Johann Lamont : The information requested is provided in the following table:

Local Authority

2004-05 (£)

2005-06 (£)

2006-07 (£)

2007-08 (£)

Total (£)

Aberdeenshire

248,000

275,750

320,000

335,000

1,178,750

Angus

369,000

409,400

480,000

519,000

1,777,400


Further and Higher Education

To ask the Scottish Executive how many and what percentage of school leavers entered full-time higher or further education in the (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire local authority areas in each of the last three years for which figures are available.

Hugh Henry : Information on the percentage of school leavers entering higher and further education can be found in the Scottish Executive’s Statistical Publication Notice Destinations of Leavers from Scottish Schools: 2005-06 published on 6 December 2006. A local authority breakdown is available at table 6 of the publication. It can be accessed at
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/stats/bulletins/00550.


National Health Service

To ask the Scottish Executive how many inpatient and outpatient appointments and procedures there were in NHS Grampian in each year since 2000.

Andy Kerr: In terms of context, it should be remembered that the successful implementation of Delivering for Health (launched in October 2005) is already bringing about a fundamental shift in the balance of care. This, quite appropriately, places a greater emphasis on anticipatory care so that those at risk of ill health receive the services they need. In effect, the NHS in Scotland is no longer waiting for people to become ill, then sending them to hospital for urgent treatment. Instead, the Executive and NHS is doing more than ever before to encourage people to lead healthy lives, and spotting and dealing with poor health before it can develop into something more serious. When people do need treatment, the Executive and NHS are committed to delivering more of it closer to home in local communities.

The information requested on the number of inpatient and day case episodes, and new and return outpatient attendances is shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Number of In-patient and Day Case Episodes, and New and Return Out-patient Attendances in NHS Grampian Board of Treatment for Years Ending 31 March 2000 to 2006

Year Ending 31 March:

In-patients

Day Cases

New Out-patients

Return Out-patients

2000

105,003

26,354

152,533

303,541

2001

103,044

27,314

151,036

301,978

2002

102,745

23,526

146,683

295,771

2003

103,695

18,797

146,780

283,893

2004

110,499

18,360

143,901

293,752

2005

105,711

18,783

120,785

277,178

2006

108,108

19,333

128,942

259,098

Source: ISD(S)1.

In addition, hospital activity is undertaken at nurse-led clinics. ISD Scotland have been working with NHS Boards to capture this information. Initial findings are published as part of ISD Scotland’s "data development" web pages at:

http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/4453.html.

Procedures are carried out within NHSScotland in a wide range of settings dependent on a number of factors including the complexity of the operation and the clinical and personal needs of the patient. Table 2 shows the number of procedures carried out on patients admitted as in-patients or day cases.

Procedures can also be performed in an outpatient setting. From April 2003, the national reporting of surgical activity in outpatients has been required and ISD has been working with NHS boards to develop full compliance nationally. At this stage only a proportion of boards have achieved extensive coverage and further work will be necessary before a complete account of all outpatient surgical activity can be made. The number of outpatient procedures recorded in NHS Grampian in the year ended 31 March 2006 was 28,567.

Table 2: Number of Procedures Performed in Acute Specialties in NHS Grampian Board of Treatment for Years Ending 31 March 2000 to 2006

Year Ending 31 March:

In-patients

Day Cases

Total Procedures

Total Procedures

2000

67,186

30,775

2001

63,238

31,711

2002

62,077

27,440

2003

68,269

22,381

2004

77,873

21,091

2005

78,282

21,810

2006

82,500

23,735

Source: SMR01.

To ask the Scottish Executive how many inpatient and outpatient appointments and procedures there were in NHS Tayside in each year since 2000.

Andy Kerr : In terms of context, it should be remembered that the successful implementation of Delivering for Health (launched in October 2005) is already bringing about a fundamental shift in the balance of care. This, quite appropriately, places a greater emphasis on anticipatory care so that those at risk of ill health receive the services they need. In effect, the NHS in Scotland is no longer waiting for people to become ill, then sending them to hospital for urgent treatment. Instead, the Executive and NHS is doing more than ever before to encourage people to lead healthy lives, and spotting and dealing with poor health before it can develop into something more serious. When people do need treatment, the Executive and NHS are committed to delivering more of it closer to home in local communities.

The information requested on the number of inpatient and day case episodes, and new and return outpatient attendances is shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Number of In-patient and Day Case Episodes, and New and Return Out-patient Attendances in NHS Tayside Board of Treatment for Years Ending 31 March 2000 to 2006

Year Ending 31 March:

In-patients

Day Cases

New Out-patients

Return Out-patients

2000

80,791

33,823

138,231

365,476

2001

78,371

34,930

133,886

356,010

2002

77,501

25,417

127,611

332,597

2003

75,322

22,246

129,918

340,588

2004

76,169

25,021

136,489

351,854

2005

73,818

24,695

139,338

348,024

2006p

73,291

25,025

131,964

337,208

Source: ISD(S)1.

pprovisional.

In addition, hospital activity is undertaken at nurse-led clinics. ISD Scotland have been working with NHS boards to capture this information. Initial findings are published as part of ISD Scotland’s "data development" web pages at:

http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/4453.html.

Procedures are carried out within NHSScotland in a wide range of settings dependent on a number of factors including the complexity of the operation and the clinical and personal needs of the patient. Table 2 shows the number of procedures carried out on patients admitted as inpatients or day cases.

Procedures can also be performed in an outpatient setting. From April 2003, the national reporting of surgical activity in outpatients has been required and ISD has been working with NHS boards to develop full compliance nationally. At this stage only a proportion of boards have achieved extensive coverage and further work will be necessary before a complete account of all outpatient surgical activity can be made. The number of outpatient procedures recorded in NHS Tayside in the year ended 31 March 2006 was 7,083.

Table 2: Number of Procedures Performed in Acute Specialties in NHS Tayside Board of Treatment for Years Ending 31 March 2000 to 2006

Year Ending 31 March:

In-patients

Day Cases

Total Procedures

Total Procedures

2000

41,010

33,262

2001

41,109

33,683

2002

39,613

23,795

2003

41,165

21,814

2004

41,327

23,936

2005

45,334

23,829

2006

45,897

24,708

Source: SMR01.

To ask the Scottish Executive how many attendances there were at each accident and emergency centre in NHS Grampian in each year since 2000.

Andy Kerr : Information on the number of attendances at each accident and emergency centre in NHS Grampian is shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Accident and Emergency Attendances in NHS Grampian by Hospital; Years Ended 31 March 2000 to 2006

Hospital/Location 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
Aberdeen Royal Infirmary 78,768 76,113 76,139 70,882 62,570 57,798 59,395
Aboyne Hospital 784 719 726 580 862 514 444
Chalmers Hospital 8,524 7,686 7,374 6,189 5,630 2,439 2,383
Dr Gray's Hospital 16,541 16,380 17,260 18,268 19,577 18,471 25,025
Fleming Cottage Hospital 771 546 524 684 559 335 221
Fraserburgh Hospital 15,891 14,846 15,189 14,515 11,290 4,435 3,759
Hyperbaric Centre - - 47 37 86 1 -
Insch and District War Memorial Hospital 618 681 718 772 925 653 618
Inverurie Hospital 728 792 766 939 1,087 580 19
Jubilee Hospital 3,856 4,161 3,992 3,915 3,555 1,716 2,022
Kincardine Community Hospital 1,720 1,673 1,410 1,725 1,704 613 434
Leanchoil Hospital 1,905 1,144 1,103 813 819 253 275
Mintlaw Group Practice - - - - - - 2
Peterhead Community Hospital 10,168 9,181 9,062 8,631 7,980 3,331 5,892
Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital 22,221 20,926 20,806 20,035 20,466 19,789 19,647
Seafield Hospital 2,135 1,962 1,276 1,470 1,687 769 562
Stephen Cottage Hospital 1,293 594 678 702 771 466 309
Turner Memorial Hospital 3,160 3,044 2,843 3,057 3,238 1,623 1,061
Turriff Cottage Hospital 2,791 3,117 3,236 3,359 2,884 1,122 877
Total 171,874 163,565 163,149 156,573 145,690 114,908 122,945

The apparent decrease in the number of accident and emergency attendances in the most recent years is largely due to activity for emergency nurse practitioners being recorded as nurse-led activity in NHS Grampian. The nurse led activity return is part of ISD’s data development initiative. Preliminary data and further information on this return is available on the ISD Scotland website at:

http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/collect2.jsp?pContentID=2789andp_applic=CCCandp_service=Content.showand.

To ask the Scottish Executive how many attendances there were at each accident and emergency centre in NHS Tayside in each year since 2000.

Andy Kerr : Information on the number of attendances at each accident and emergency centre in NHS Tayside is shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Accident and Emergency Attendances in NHS Tayside by hospital; Years Ended 31 March 2000 to 2006

Hospital/Location

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005p

2006P

Aberfeldy Community Hospital

734

838

799

742

639

575

340

Arbroath Infirmary

13,483

11,745

11,763

12,026

10,920

11,070

11,996

Blairgowrie Community Hospital

3,318

2,966

3,136

3,954

4,699

3,021

1,502

Brechin Infirmary

1,684

1,615

1,560

1,775

3,362

4,678

5,067

Crieff Community Hospital

4,276

3,715

3,583

4,022

3,549

2,780

2,756

Forfar Infirmary

4,293

4,794

4,970

4,758

4,800

4,927

140

Esk House Health Clinic, Montrose

-

-

-

-

-

-

8,855

Irvine Memorial Hospital

1,526

1,402

1,596

1,596

1,433

1,254

1,840

Links Health Centre

-

-

-

-

3,269

2,981

-

Montrose Royal Infirmary

3,366

3,054

3,277

3,613

959

3,215

-

Ninewells Hospital

36,516

35,283

42,968

47,677

48,096

49,723

50,620

Perth Royal Infirmary

28,664

27,224

26,780

24,025

24,472

24,714

25,460

St Margaret's Hospital

1,778

1,892

2,401

2,168

2,094

1,612

891

Stracathro Hospital

6,171

5,477

4,947

3,267

766

-

-

Whitehills Health & Community Care Centre

-

-

-

-

-

-

6,417

Total

105,809

100,005

107,780

109,623

109,058

110,550

115,884

Note:

PProvisional, some information is estimated.

To ask the Scottish Executive how many operations were carried out in hospitals in NHS Grampian in each year since 2000.

Andy Kerr : In terms of context, it should be remembered that the successful implementation of Delivering for Health (launched in October 2005) is already bringing about a fundamental shift in the balance of care. This, quite appropriately, places a greater emphasis on anticipatory care so that those at risk of ill health receive the services they need. In effect, the NHS in Scotland is no longer waiting for people to become ill, then sending them to hospital for urgent treatment. Instead, the Executive and NHS is doing more than ever before to encourage people to lead healthy lives, and spotting and dealing with poor health before it can develop into something more serious. When people do need treatment, the Executive and NHS are committed to delivering more of it closer to home in local communities.

Operations are carried out within NHSScotland in a wide range of settings dependent on a number of factors including the complexity of the operation and the clinical and personal needs of the patient. Table 1 shows the number of operations carried out on patients admitted as in-patients or day cases.

Operations can also be performed in an out-patient setting. From April 2003, the national reporting of surgical activity in out-patients has been required and ISD has been working with NHS boards to develop full compliance nationally. At this stage only a proportion of boards have achieved extensive coverage and further work will be necessary before a complete account of all out-patient surgical activity can be made. The number of out-patient operations recorded in NHS Grampian in the year ended 31 March 2006 was 25,381.

Table 1: Number of operations1,2 performed in acute specialties in NHS Grampian board of treatment for years ended 31 March 2000 to 2006

Year Ending 31 March:

In-Patients

Day Cases

Total Operations

Principal Operations

Total Operations

Principal Operations

2000

49,693

34,659

28,065

23,898

2001

46,847

32,891

28,534

24,378

2002

46,130

32,631

26,081

22,141

2003

47,127

32,678

21,257

17,681

2004

46,862

32,858

19,862

16,851

2005

46,127

32,075

20,344

17,278

2006P

48,744

33,654

22,226

18,728

Source: SMR01.

PProvisional.

Notes:

1. "Operations" has been assumed to be the number of invasive procedures undertaken. ISD Scotland does not maintain a definitive code list that distinguishes between invasive and non-invasive procedures. However, there are a few non-invasive procedures that are easily identified and as a result have been excluded from the information in Table 1, they include:

X29 – Continuous infusion of therapeutic substance (including chemotherapy)

X33 – Other blood transfusions

X35 – Other intravenous injection

X55 – Other operations on unspecified organs (this includes MRI scans and various types of imaging).

2. The information in table 1 therefore includes all procedures (other than those specified above) whether invasive or non-invasive.

To ask the Scottish Executive how many operations were carried out in each hospital in NHS Tayside in the last year for which the information is available.

Andy Kerr : In terms of context, it should be remembered that the successful implementation of Delivering for Health (launched in October 2005) is already bringing about a fundamental shift in the balance of care. This, quite appropriately, places a greater emphasis on anticipatory care so that those at risk of ill health receive the services they need. In effect, the NHS in Scotland is no longer waiting for people to become ill, then sending them to hospital for urgent treatment. Instead, the Executive and NHS is doing more than ever before to encourage people to lead healthy lives, and spotting and dealing with poor health before it can develop into something more serious. When people do need treatment, the Executive and NHS are committed to delivering more of it closer to home in local communities.

Operations are carried out within NHSScotland in a wide range of settings dependent on a number of factors including the complexity of the operation and the clinical and personal needs of the patient. Table 1 shows the number of operations carried out on patients admitted as in-patients or day cases.

Operations can also be performed in an out-patient setting. From April 2003, the national reporting of surgical activity in out-patients has been required and ISD has been working with NHS boards to develop full compliance nationally. At this stage only a proportion of boards have achieved extensive coverage and further work will be necessary before a complete account of all out-patient surgical activity can be made. The number of out-patient operations recorded in NHS Tayside in the year ended 31 March 2006 was 7,083.

Table 1: Number of Operations1,2 Performed in Acute Specialties in each NHS Tayside Hospital for Year Ended 31 March 2006P

Location

In-Patients

Day Cases

Total Operations

Total Operations

Blairgowrie Community Hospital

14

0

Brechin Infirmary

12

2

Crieff Community Hospital

5

0

Fernbrae Hospital

69

3

Irvine Memorial Hospital

5

0

Ninewells Hospital

22,866

13,430

Perth Royal Infirmary

6,768

4,626

St Margaret's Hospital

11

0

Stracathro Hospital

1,099

2,552

All Tayside Hospitals

30,849

20,613

Source: SMR01.

PProvisional.

Notes:

1. "Operations" has been assumed to be the number of invasive procedures undertaken. ISD Scotland does not maintain a definitive code list that distinguishes between invasive and non-invasive procedures. However, there are a few non-invasive procedures that are easily identified and as a result have been excluded from the information in Table 1, they include:

X29 – Continuous infusion of therapeutic substance (including chemotherapy)

X33 – Other blood transfusions

X35 – Other intravenous injection

X55 – Other operations on unspecified organs (this includes MRI scans and various types of imaging)

2. The information in table 1 therefore includes all procedures (other than those specified above) whether invasive or non-invasive.

To ask the Scottish Executive how many operations were carried out in hospitals in NHS Tayside in each year since 2000.

Andy Kerr : In terms of context, it should be remembered that the successful implementation of Delivering for Health (launched in October 2005) is already bringing about a fundamental shift in the balance of care. This, quite appropriately, places a greater emphasis on anticipatory care so that those at risk of ill health receive the services they need. In effect, the NHS in Scotland is no longer waiting for people to become ill, then sending them to hospital for urgent treatment. Instead, the Executive and NHS is doing more than ever before to encourage people to lead healthy lives, and spotting and dealing with poor health before it can develop into something more serious. When people do need treatment, the Executive and NHS are committed to delivering more of it closer to home in local communities.

Operations are carried out within NHSScotland in a wide range of settings dependent on a number of factors including the complexity of the operation and the clinical and personal needs of the patient. Table 1 shows the number of operations carried out on patients admitted as in-patients or day cases.

Operations can also be performed in an out-patient setting. From April 2003, the national reporting of surgical activity in out-patients has been required and ISD has been working with NHS boards to develop full compliance nationally. At this stage only a proportion of boards have achieved extensive coverage and further work will be necessary before a complete account of all out-patient surgical activity can be made. The number of out-patient operations recorded in NHS Tayside in the year ended 31 March 2006 was 7,083.

Table 1: Number of Operations1,2 Performed in Acute Specialties in NHS Tayside Board of Treatment for Years Ended 31 March 2000 to 2006

Year Ending 31 March:

In-Patients

Day Cases

Total Operations

Total Operations

2000

33,465

30,429

2001

32,693

30,468

2002

31,433

21,467

2003

31,406

19,250

2004

30,354

20,758

2005

30,684

20,173

2006P

30,849

20,613

Source: SMR01.

PProvisional.

Notes:

1. "Operations" has been assumed to be the number of invasive procedures undertaken. ISD Scotland does not maintain a definitive code list that distinguishes between invasive and non-invasive procedures. However, there are a few non-invasive procedures that are easily identified and as a result have been excluded from the information in Table 1, they include:

X29 – Continuous infusion of therapeutic substance (including chemotherapy)

X33 – Other blood transfusions

X35 – Other intravenous injection

X55 – Other operations on unspecified organs (this includes MRI scans and various types of imaging)

2. The information in table 1 therefore includes all procedures (other than those specified above) whether invasive or non-invasive.


Housing

To ask the Scottish Executive what funding has been made available for the provision of affordable housing in (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire in each year since 2003-04.

Rhona Brankin : I have asked Angiolina Foster, Chief Executive of Communities Scotland to respond. Her response is as follows:

The affordable housing funding provided by Communities Scotland is set out in the following table:

Year

Angus

(£ Million)

Aberdeenshire

(£ Million)

2003-04

4.355

12.734

2004-05

4.376

12.037

2005-06

5.518

11.139

2006-07*

6.504

13.086

Note: *Figures for 2006-07 are budget figures.


Early Years

To ask the Scottish Executive how much (a) Dundee City, (b) Angus and (c) Aberdeenshire councils received under the Sure Start Scotland programme in the last year for which the information is available.

Hugh Henry : Sure Start Scotland funding for the three local authority areas in the financial year 2006-07, was as follows:

Dundee City £1.77 million
Angus £1.13 million
Aberdeenshire £2.32 million

11 January 2007

NCR Dundee

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): I express the hope that if today's meeting at NCR is followed by an announcement of job losses, the First Minister will do everything in his power to ensure that the workforce has a smooth transition into alternative employment.

Given that some members of the workforce have been employed by NCR for decades, I ask that special consideration be given to Dundee.

The First Minister: We should reserve our position on special consideration for Dundee until we see details on the scale of any announcement. It is clear that if a significant impact on jobs is announced, we would want to make special arrangements to help the city of Dundee.

However, it is important that we do not lose sight of our overall strategy for Dundee and for Scotland.

The manufacturing export results that were announced yesterday show that year-on-year improvements have been made in manufacturing exports, following all the problems that we had in electronic engineering just six or seven years ago.

It is important that we continue with our strategy of supporting and commercialising research and development.

As well as attracting companies into Scotland, we must build up Scottish companies that can employ Scottish workers


21 December 2006

Public Spending and Revenue

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive what the total gap has been between public expenditure in Scotland and revenues raised since 1999.

The Minister for Finance and Public Service Reform (Mr Tom McCabe): According to the "Government Expenditure and Revenue in Scotland" analysis, the cumulative gap between public expenditure in Scotland and public revenues raised in Scotland since 1999 is a massive £49.7 billion.

Marlyn Glen: Does the minister agree that the massive deficit to which he refers and of which he has given details would prohibit the writing off of student debt, make impossible a council tax freeze—even if that were legal—and make a nonsense of any promise that workers in a separate Scotland would pay no extra taxes?

Budgeting may seem difficult, but it is obvious that we cannot spend what we do not have.

Will the minister assure us that Executive policies are designed to protect hard-working families through service provision, as well as being fair to, for example, small businesses in Scotland?

Mr McCabe: I assure the member that the United Kingdom serves Scotland well, as is self-evident from the figures that I reiterated a moment ago.

I concur that the report highlights the fact that affection for nationalism would die instantly if we ever found ourselves in an independent Scotland.

The figures make it clear in a very serious way that the progress that this country has made would not only come to a crashing halt but would be thrown into reverse gear.

Generations would be denied the opportunity to maximise their potential and this country would be an economic basket case, simply because one political party had decided to put an ideology before the best interests of its citizens.

I am confident that if we continue to discuss those figures and the potential impact of that ideology, people in Scotland will again reject it, allow progress to continue and allow Scotland to flourish as it should.


Drug Treatment

15 December 2006

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive how many drug users have entered treatment in Tayside in each of the last five years.

Cathy Jamieson : The information requested is available online at:

http://www.drugmisuse.isdscotland.org/publications/abstracts/ISDbull.htm.


Employment

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of employed adults in Aberdeenshire worked from home in each of the last three years.

Nicol Stephen: Table 1 shows the percentage of adults in employment who work from home in their main job in Aberdeenshire for the last three years for which data are available.

Table 1 Percentage of People Working from Home in Aberdeenshire, 2003-05

 

Working from Home

2003

13%

2004

15%

2005

13%

Source:

2004 and 2005 Data from Annual Population Survey.

2003 Data from Annual Scottish Labour Force Survey.

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of employed adults in Angus worked from home in each of the last three years.

Nicol Stephen : Table 1 shows the percentage of employed adults people who work from home in their main job in Angus for the last three years for which data are available.

Table 1 Percentage of People Working from Home in Angus, 2003-05

 

Working from Home

2003

9%

2004

10%

2005

10%

Source:

2004 and 2005 Data from Annual Population Survey.

2003 Data from Annual Scottish Labour Force Survey.

 

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of employed adults in Dundee worked from home in each of the last three years.

Answered by Nicol Stephen (15 December 2006): Table 1 shows the percentage of employed adults people who work from home in their main job in Dundee for the last three years for which data are available.

Table 1 Percentage of people working from home in Dundee, 2003-05

 

Working from Home

2003

5%

2004

5%

2005

6%

Source:

2004 and 2005 Data from Annual Population Survey

2003 Data from Annual Scottish Labour Force Survey

Bursaries

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive how many full-time university students in the (a) Dundee City, (b) Angus and (c) Aberdeenshire local authority area have been in receipt of bursaries in each of the last three years.

Nicol Stephen : The following table highlights the number of bursaries awarded by the Student Awards Agency for Scotland to full-time university students who were domiciled in the (a) Dundee City, (b) Angus and (c) Aberdeenshire local authority areas in each of the last three academic years:

Academic Year

Full-Time University Students Receiving a Bursary, by Local Authority Area

(a) Dundee City

(b) Angus

(c) Aberdeenshire

2003-04

1,250

935

1,860

2004-05

1,295

960

1,830

2005-06

1,355

1,060

1,895

Source: Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).

Note: All student numbers in this table are rounded up or down to the nearest five.

Students can receive a number of different financial awards/bursaries, including travel expenses, Young Students Bursary, Lone Parents Grant, Standard Maintenance Allowance, Disabled Students Allowance, Lone Parents Childcare Grant, Young Students Outside Scotland Bursary and Dependants Grant. Students receiving any of these bursaries or allowances are included in the table.

 

Unemployment

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) : To ask the Scottish Executive what the claimant count number and claimant count unemployment rate have been in each ward of Angus Council in the most recent month for which figures are available.

Nicol Stephen: The Claimant Count gives the number of people claiming unemployment related benefits and is produced by the Office of National Statistics.

Table 1 shows the claimant count number and the claimant count rate for each ward in Angus month of October 2006.

Please note that the rates are calculated using the resident working age population.

Table 1 Claimant Count Unemployment for Wards in Angus, October 2006

Angus Wards

Number

Rate

Kirriemuir West

33

1.4

Kirriemuir East

50

2.2

Brechin West

31

1.3

Brechin North Esk

75

3.2

Westfield and Dean

35

1.3

Forfar West

43

2.2

Forfar Central

43

1.9

Forfar East

50

2.5

Brechin South Esk

93

5.4

Montrose Ferryden

100

4.3

Montrose Central

114

5.7

Montrose West

67

3.0

Montrose Hillside

49

2.0

Forfar South

38

2.0

Letham and Friockheim

28

1.1

Sidlaw West

29

1.1

Sidlaw East and Ashludie

33

1.4

Monifieth West

30

1.2

Monifieth Central

20

1.1

Carnoustie West

54

2.1

Carnoustie Central

28

1.4

Carnoustie East

20

0.8

Arbirlot and Hospitalfield

77

3.6

Keptie

46

2.1

Arbroath North

49

1.8

Brothock

117

5.5

Hayshead and Lunan

63

2.8

Harbour

136

6.7

Cliffburn

94

4.5

Total

1,645

2.7

Source: Office for National Statistics.

Notes:

  1. Data are numbers of people claiming unemployment related benefits.

2. Proportions for wards are calculated using the mid-2001 resident working age population.


Planning

12 December 2006

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive how much expenditure has been allocated to the (a) Dundee City, (b) Angus and (c) Aberdeenshire council to develop and promote the planning system through online access.

Des McNulty : The E-Planning Efficient Government Programme is a key component of planning reform. The programme involves 40 partners. Work is on-going on estimating the cost of the proposed e-planning systems for each partner, but based on work to date the estimates are:

  1. Dundee City Council – £41,000
  2. Angus Council – £78,000
  3. Aberdeenshire Council – £119,000.

 

The aim of the programme is to bring all partners up to the same level of e-planning service, so allocations vary based on how advanced the e-planning systems of the partners are and their overall level of involvement in the programme.


Health

7 December 2006

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive how many stroke-related deaths there were in (a) Dundee and (b) Angus in each of the last 10 years, expressed also as a standardised rate for those under 75 per 100,000 population.

George Lyon : The information requested is given in the following table.

Deaths from Cerebrovascular Diseases (Stroke) 1, Selected Council Areas, 1996-2005

 

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

(a) Dundee City                    
All ages: number

180

173

183

184

191

154

182

158

185

163

Under 75: number

54

43

57

53

55

48

48

39

36

42

Under 75: rate2

29.9

25.8

32.0

31.5

29.7

29.5

27.0

23.7

21.5

26.2

(b) Angus                    
All ages: number

172

165

159

170

176

161

178

173

172

146

Under 75: number

32

34

36

40

31

31

32

35

32

19

Under 75: rate2

25.8

26.4

27.4

29.6

25.1

22.9

24.8

24.4

23.1

13.2

 

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive how many (a) knee-joint replacement and (b) cataract operations have been carried out in NHS Tayside in each year since 2000.

Andy Kerr : The number of operations and procedures undertaken as in-patients or day cases is published on the ISD Scotland website at:

http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/files/Annual_trends_in_surgical_procedures_hbt_November2006.xls.

Knee replacement and cataract operations in Tayside since 2000 can be selected by using the "procedure" and "NHS Board of Treatment" menus within the file.

Cataract operations can also be performed in an out-patient setting. From April 2003 the national reporting of surgical activity in out-patients has been required and ISD has been working with NHS boards to develop full compliance nationally. Emerging findings from the data collection for out-patient procedures are published in the data development section of the ISD Scotland website at http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/4454.html.


Health

16 November 2006

Marlyn Glen: To ask the what the annual percentage of (a) singleton births and (b) births following gestation of less than 37 weeks has been of all births since 2001, also broken down by NHS board.

Lewis Macdonald:

The following tables attached contains the information requested.

Table 1a) Percentage of singleton births against all births by NHS board of residence.

Year ending 31 March

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Scotland

97.1

96.9

97.0

96.9

97.1

Argyll & Clyde

96.9

97.0

97.0

97.7

97.3

Ayrshire & Arran

97.1

95.9

96.7

97.0

96.6

Borders

96.2

98.2

96.7

98.0

95.2

Dumfries & Galloway

98.7

97.8

96.4

97.4

97.4

Fife

97.2

96.8

97.2

97.1

96.8

Forth Valley

97.4

97.1

97.7

97.5

97.3

Grampian

96.7

97.2

96.5

96.8

97.7

Greater Glasgow

97.4

96.6

96.9

96.2

97.0

Highland

95.7

96.7

97.6

96.3

97.7

Lanarkshire

96.7

97.5

97.2

97.1

96.8

Lothian

97.2

97.2

97.0

96.8

96.9

Orkney

94.6

96.0

97.6

93.7

97.8

Shetland

97.2

99.1

99.1

96.5

96.6

Tayside

97.4

96.5

96.8

96.7

97.3

Western Isles

97.4

99.1

98.3

97.5

95.5

Table 1b) Percentage of births with a gestation of less than 37 weeks against all births by NHS board of residence.

Year ending 31 March

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Scotland

7.7

7.6

7.8

8.2

7.9

Argyll & Clyde

9.2

8.0

8.0

8.9

8.4

Ayrshire & Arran

8.2

8.6

9.4

8.7

9.2

Borders

8.4

5.5

6.6

7.5

5.9

Dumfries & Galloway

7.2

8.7

8.1

7.2

7.5

Fife

7.1

7.3

7.7

7.5

6.3

Forth Valley

7.5

8.5

8.1

8.1

6.9

Grampian

8.1

7.6

9.1

8.4

8.2

Greater Glasgow

7.8

8.2

8.0

8.9

8.5

Highland

8.7

6.4

6.7

7.2

7.5

Lanarkshire

7.0

6.6

6.3

7.8

7.4

Lothian

7.1

6.9

7.3

8.1

8.0

Orkney

8.8

6.0

3.0

14.5

8.8

Shetland

6.5

7.4

3.6

6.1

7.3

Tayside

7.2

8.0

7.6

8.0

7.5

Western Isles

7.0

5.2

4.1

4.1

8.6

 

Educational Maintenance Allowances

Marlyn Glen : To ask the how many awards of Education Maintenance Allowance have been made in (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire in 2005-06 and what total amounts were paid in each area.

Nicol Stephen:

The following table shows the number of school students supported in the (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire local authority areas in 2005-06 and the total amounts paid out in each area in academic year 2005-06:

 

(a) Angus local authority area

(b) Aberdeenshire local authority area

  Number of school students receiving EMA Total amounts paid out* (£) Number of school students receiving EMA Total amounts paid out* (£)
2005-06

460

433,250

725

730,420

Source: Scottish Executive

All student numbers in this table are rounded up or down to the nearest 5.

* The totals included here include all weekly payments, bonus 1 payments and bonus 2 payments.

The Education Maintenance Allowance programme was introduced across Scotland from August 2004. Currently 16 and 17 year old students are eligible across Scotland.


Health

15 November 2006

Marlyn Glen: To ask the what proportion of obese adults have been diagnosed as having diabetes, broken down (a) by gender and (b) into age range (i) 16 to 24, (ii) 25 to 34, (iii) 35 to 44, (iv) 45 to 54, (v) 55 to 64, (vi) 65 to 74 and (vii) 75 and over.

Andy Kerr : This information is not held centrally.

Marlyn Glen  To ask the how much it is spending on the Measure Up awareness campaign on the possible link between waist measurement and a risk of diabetes.

Andy Kerr: Measure Up’ is a Diabetes UK campaign, supported by an educational grant from sanofi-aventis. The Scottish Executive has not made a financial contribution to the campaign. However, the Executive supports the objectives of the campaign and the Minister for Health and Community Care helped to launch the campaign in Scotland on 12 September 2006.

Andy Kerr: To ask the what the childhood immunisation rates for Dundee Community Health Partnership have been in the last quarter for which the information is available.

The information requested is published on the Information Services Division of the NHS in Scotland (ISD) website at: ‎http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/info3.jsp?pContentID=2486&p_applic=CCC&p_service=Content.show& .‎

Marlyn Glen : To ask the what the childhood immunisation rates for Aberdeenshire Community Health Partnership have been in the last quarter for which the information is available.

Andy Kerr :  The information requested is published on the Information Services Division of the NHS in Scotland (ISD) website at: http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/info3.jsp?pContentID=2486&p_applic=CCC&p_service=Content.show& .‎

 

Marlyn Glen: To ask the what the childhood immunisation rates for Angus Community Health Partnership have been in the last quarter for which the information is available.

Andy Kerr :  The information requested is published on the Information Services Division of the NHS in Scotland (ISD) website at: http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/info3.jsp?pContentID=2486&p_applic=CCC&p_service=Content.show& .‎

 

Smoking

Marlyn Glen: To ask the what percentage of mothers have smoked during pregnancy in each of the last three years, also broken down by NHS board.

Lewis Macdonald:

Table 1) Percentage of mothers smoking at booking.

Year ending 31 March

2003

2004

2005

Scotland

25.3

23.9

22.7

Argyll & Clyde

24.1

21.3

23.0

Ayrshire & Arran

29.9

28.5

29.6

Borders

25.8

24.8

27.6

Dumfries & Galloway

28.0

21.9

25.3

Fife

29.3

27.7

28.0

Forth Valley

27.0

25.3

23.1

Grampian

24.2

23.9

21.3

Greater Glasgow

26.4

24.8

23.8

Highland

26.8

26.4

23.1

Lanarkshire

27.5

24.5

25.3

Lothian

17.9

17.6

12.6

Orkney

18.3

12.3

15.6

Shetland

14.2

10.7

12.3

Tayside

28.6

28.3

26.8

Western Isles

20.8

14.1

17.1

 

Carers

Marlyn Glen: To ask the how many providers of unpaid care there are estimated to be in (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire.

Lewis Macdonald:

I refer the member to the questions S2W-11759 answered on 9 November 2004 and S2W-04826 answered on 8 January 2004 which set out the numbers of unpaid carers for each individual local authority, as identified in the 2001 Census. All answers to written PQs are available on the Parliament’s website, the search facility for which can be found at http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/webapp/wa.search.

 

Hearing

Marlyn Glen : To ask the how many people over the age of 75 it estimates are deaf or hard of hearing.

Lewis Macdonald:

The latest report on hearing impairment in adults, produced by the Public Health Institute for Scotland in January 2003, estimates 160 thousand people aged 81 and above have some degree of hearing impairment: that is, 91% of the population aged 81 and above at that time.

 

Sight

Marlyn Glen: To ask the how many people over the age of 75 it estimates are visually impaired.

Lewis Macdonald:

The latest information on visually impaired people was published by the Executive on 31 October 2006, in the statistics release Registered blind and partially sighted persons, Scotland 2006. In 2006, the number of people aged 75 and over registered as blind or partially sighted was estimated to be 24,047. Research studies suggest that between a quarter and a third of visually impaired people are in fact registered.

 

Birth weight

Marlyn Glen: To ask the what the percentage of singleton low birth weight babies has been of all births in each three-year period since1996-98, also broken down by NHS board.

Lewis Macdonald:

Please find the information requested in the following table:

1) Percentage of singleton low birth weight babies.

Year ending 31 March

1997-1999

2000-2002

2003-2005

Scotland

5.7

5.9

6.0

Argyll & Clyde

5.9

6.5

6.7

Ayrshire & Arran

5.4

6.1

6.1

Borders

5.1

4.8

5.0

Dumfries & Galloway

5.0

5.6

5.0

Fife

5.5

5.3

6.0

Forth Valley

5.5

5.8

6.0

Grampian

5.1

5.3

5.5

Greater Glasgow

7.0

6.8

7.0

Highland

4.6

5.3

5.6

Lanarkshire

5.9

5.7

5.4

Lothian

5.4

5.7

6.0

Orkney

2.1

3.6

4.1

Shetland

3.6

3.6

3.2

Tayside

5.4

5.4

5.6

Western Isles

2.6

5.0

4.8


Learning Difficulties

14 November 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive how many pupils had specific learning difficulties in each of the last two years.

Robert Brown: The requested figures on how many pupils had specific learning difficulties are published annually in Pupils in Scotland, which is available on the Executive website:

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2006/02/28083932/9

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/04/11114958/50073.


Concessionary Travel

14 November 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive what the uptake of concessionary travel cards under the national concessionary travel scheme has been in (a) Dundee, (b) Angus and (c) Aberdeenshire.

Tavish Scott: The number of National Entitlement Cards, which give an entitlement to the Scotland-Wide Free Bus Travel for Older and Disabled People, within the requested areas are as follows:

(a) Dundee

Category of Eligibility Number of Cardholders
60+ 27,294
Disabled 2,219
Disabled plus companion 484
Visually impaired 569
Visually impaired plus companion 71
Total 30,637

(b) Angus

Category of Eligibility Number of Cardholders
60+ 19,984
Disabled 738
Disabled plus companion 192
Visually impaired 253
Visually impaired plus companion 77
Total 21,244

(c) Aberdeenshire

Category of Eligibility Number of Cardholders
60+ 33,587
Disabled 1,723
Disabled plus companion 1,096
Visually impaired 81
Visually impaired plus companion 388
Total 36,875

Prisoners (Home Leave)

26 October 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the First Minister what guarantees can be given that public safety will not be compromised by the proposed home leave for inmates of open prisons at Christmas.

The First Minister (Mr Jack McConnell): All prisoners in open prisons must have been assessed as presenting a low risk to the public before being transferred there.

Almost all will have some entitlement to home leave throughout the year as part of their rehabilitation programme.

However, no one will be allowed home leave without a rigorous safety assessment.

Marlyn Glen: I thank the First Minister for his reassurance.

Does he agree that all political parties should be consistent in supporting that policy, instead of having a knee-jerk reaction to misleading press reports?

The First Minister: I agree absolutely.

There are members who claim to support systems for rehabilitation but who are quick to criticise them as soon as there is an opportunity to get themselves in the headlines.

I would hope that all members would desist from such practices.

Stewart Stevenson (Banff and Buchan) (SNP): I am sure that the First Minister agrees that one of the most important elements of rehabilitation that the prison service can deliver relates to drug abuse, which takes the majority of prisoners into prison.

The Presiding Officer: Is this a question about home leave, Mr Stevenson?

Stewart Stevenson: In that context, in relation to open prisons, does the First Minister support my view that prisoners who are being released for home leave should be tested for drug abuse before they leave and after they return, to ensure continuity of rehabilitation from drug abuse?

The First Minister: If we were to implement the Scottish National Party's policy on prisons, that would be difficult to achieve.

The SNP published its policy proposals, entitled "Our policies for a safer Scotland", in which it says clearly that it would introduce new sentencing options, including weekend prisons.

For Mr MacAskill, who is Mr Stevenson's boss, to say last week that society has deemed that those people should be punished but that they are not being punished over the festive period because a limited number of prisoners are being allowed home, when, in fact, the SNP wants many more prisoners to be allowed home every single week of the year, is sheer hypocrisy.

The Scottish National Party's policies would have more credibility if it was consistent and did not jump from having one policy statement in its policy document to grabbing headlines on another occasion.


Gender Proofing

26 October 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab):To ask the Scottish Executive what plans there are to improve the gender proofing of policies across departmental portfolios.

The Deputy Minister for Communities (Johann Lamont): The duty to promote equality of opportunity between women and men, as introduced by the Equality Act 2006, is expected to come into force in Scotland in April 2007.

As a public authority, the Executive, along with its agencies, is subject to that duty.

Key parts of the new duty are ensuring that all new key policies and activities are assessed for their impact on gender equality and making arrangements to review key existing policies.

We believe that effective equality impact assessment is key to equality mainstreaming and to the delivery of the gender duty and the other public sector equality duties.

The Executive has been developing an equality impact assessment tool and guidance, which will be made available to all Executive officials to enable them to assess the impact of their policies across a number of equality strands, including gender.

Marlyn Glen: I acknowledge the progress that is being made, even though the duty has not yet come in.

Will the minister outline how departments are to be further encouraged to take a more uniform approach to equalities reporting, because at the moment different approaches are still being adopted?

Johann Lamont: It is key that we ensure that there is discussion throughout the Executive rather than just within departments.

I know that members of the Equal Opportunities Committee will challenge the Minister for Communities, Malcolm Chisholm, when he discusses the budget with them in due course and talks about the practicalities of how that can be delivered.

Underlying our desire to get the budgets right is our desire to get the policy right.

Today we mark the second anniversary of the establishment of the domestic abuse court and the assist service, which has liberated people to use their talents to support women who are dealing with domestic abuse through the justice system, so that they get justice and are not victimised further.

We should recognise the need to put in place the budgets to match our policy commitment.

We will talk about assessment tools and all the rest of it and will ensure that Executive officials talk to each other, but our commitment and energy to deliver equality for women will drive the budget—it will not be the other way round.


Economy

6 October 2006

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive what the local economic output of Dundee has been in each of the last three years for which figures are available and what the percentage annual changes have been.

Nicol Stephen: Gross Value Added (GVA) is the preferred measure of economic activity within an area. GVA data for local areas are published by the Office for National Statistics, however, figures for the City of Dundee and Angus are not available separately.

Gross Value Added (GVA) at Current Basic Prices (£ Millions), 2001-03

  2001 2002 2003
Angus and Dundee City

3,081

3,258

3,461

Annual % Change

2.3%

5.7%

6.2%

Source: Office for National Statistics.

It is important to note that the annual percentage changes presented above should not be taken as an indicator of economic growth in the area as they have not been adjusted for inflation.

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive how many VAT registered businesses there have been in (a) Dundee and (b) Angus in each of the last three years for which figures are available, broken down by sector.

Nicol Stephen: Data on the number of VAT registered enterprises are released annually by the Small Business Service, an agency of the Department of Trade and Industry. A breakdown by sector is only available at a UK-level.

Start of Year Stock of VAT Registered Enterprises, 2003-05

Local Authority Area 2003 2004 2005
Dundee City

2,345

2,360

2,360

Angus

2,905

2,895

2,895

Source: Small Business Service, DTI.

Please note that these figures do not account for all business activity as only companies with a turnover above the VAT threshold are required to register. The VAT threshold is increased each year. It was £48,000 in 1997 increasing to £58,000 in 2004.

 

Gender and earnings

6 October 2006

Marlyn Glen : To ask the what the average gross (a) hourly and (b) weekly pay has been of full-time employees in Dundee in each of the last three years, broken down by gender.

The preferred source for earnings estimates is the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), which is carried out by the Office for National Statistics.

The following table shows the median gross pay for full-time employees in Dundee by gender in 2003, 2004 and 2005. The median is the recommended measure of average for earnings as opposed to the mean.

Table 1 – Median gross hourly and weekly pay for full-time employees in Dundee by gender (£).

 

2003

 

2004

2005

 

Male

Female

 

Male

Female

Male

Female

Median hourly pay

9.51

8.26

 

9.49

8.23

10.02

9.39

Median weekly pay

385.50

302.90

 

371.40

309.90

392.80

343.70

Source: Annual Survey for Hours and Earnings

Notes:

1. The estimates are based on the pay excluding overtime for employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence.

2. The estimates are based on a sample survey, and as such, are subject to sampling error.

3. To improve coverage and hence make the survey more representative, supplementary information was collected from the 2004 ASHE survey onwards. The 2004 and 2005 ASHE results are therefore discontinuous with the results for 2003 and previous years, for which no supplementary information was collected.

4. Weekly rates of pay have been rounded to the nearest 10 pence.

5. Rates are based on residence based earnings.


Women Offenders

28 September 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive what progress has been made on extending across Scotland the range of interventions targeting the specific offending needs of women.

The Minister for Justice (Cathy Jamieson): The Executive has taken forward a wide range of measures in response to the 2002 report from the ministerial group on women offenders. That includes the successful 218 time-out centre In Glasgow.

The needs of women offenders are one of the top priorities in our strategy for reducing reoffending, which we published in May, and we have set up a short-life group with people who have a wide range of practical experience in working with women offenders. The group has met twice and is looking at the lessons from the 218 centre and preparing a blueprint on what more can be done for women through the new community justice authorities.

Marlyn Glen: I am glad to hear that the issue is still a top priority for the Executive. However, I am concerned about the length of time for which we have been talking about it and the slow progress that we are making. Are there plans to set targets and a timeline for the reduction in the number of women who are inappropriately placed in prison? I am concerned that, although lots is going on in the justice portfolio, some of it has not been gender proofed. For instance, the Scottish Sentencing Commission's report, to which Duncan McNeil just referred, does not mention women at all, and we know that women are imprisoned for lesser crimes than those for which men are imprisoned.

Cathy Jamieson: Marlyn Glen makes a number of interesting points. I know that she has taken a particular interest in the issue. The wider reforms of the justice system in general are designed to benefit the whole population, including women; however, there are some issues that we require to look at in more detail. That is why we have asked the working group to prepare a blueprint. I want to see what ideas the group comes forward with and what the new community justice authorities are going to do in their areas to join up better the work that is done in prison and in the community. That will give us the focus to do exactly what Marlyn Glen has suggested.


Health

27 September 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what the average age of mothers was for all births in (a) Dundee and (b) Angus in (i) 2005, (ii) 1985 and (iii) 1965.


George Lyon : The information requested is not available for 1965. The available information is given in the following table.

Average Age of Mother at Birth

Council Area

1985

2005

Dundee City

25.3

27.7

Angus

26.6

29.0

 

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many births were registered solely in the mother’s name in (a) Dundee and (b) Angus in (i) 2005, (ii) 2000, (iii) 1995 and (iv) 1985, also expressed as a percentage of all births registered in each area over the same timescale.

George Lyon : The information requested is given in the following table.

Births Registered Solely in Mother’s Name

Council area

 

1985

1995

2000

2005

Dundee City Number

201

190

151

122

% of all births

9.3

10.9

10.3

7.9

Angus Number

65

67

53

55

% of all births

5.0

5.3

5.1

5.0

 

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what the age-specific fertility rates were in (a) Dundee and (b) Angus in (i) 2005, (ii) 1985 and (iii) 1965, broken down into mothers aged (1) 20 to 24, (2) 25 to 29, (3) 30 to 34, (4) 35 to 39 and (5) 40 to 44.


George Lyon : The information requested is not available for 1965. The available information is given in the following table.

Age-Specific Fertility Rates Per 1,000 Female Population

Council Area

Age of Mother

20-24

25-29

30-34

35-39

40-44

Dundee City          
2005

59

89

76

38

6

1985

101

118

55

14

2

Angus          
2005

98

110

91

40

7

1985

126

134

61

20

2

 


Justice

25 September 2005

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive, in light of the recent judgment by the Law Lords in the case of McFarlane v McFarlane, whether Scottish Ministers intend to propose a change to the law in Scotland that determines financial settlement on divorce.

Hugh Henry : No. We are content that an application for financial settlement made in terms of sections 9(1)(b) and 9(1)(c) of the Family Law (Scotland) Act 1985 would be capable of attracting an award that reflects the Law Lords judgement in this case. Section 9(1)(b) allows one of the parties to a divorce to claim a net economic disadvantage suffered in the interests of the other party or of the family. Where this is proved, it is open to the courts to make a fixed sum compensatory award payable in lump sums or instalments. There is no three year or other limit on the duration of the period over which the instalments can be ordered. Section 9(1)(c) allows a claim to be made for the equal sharing of the economic burden of caring, after divorce, for a child of the marriage under the age of 16.


Climate Change

22 September 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what the estimated total levels of CO2 emissions have been in (a) Dundee, (b) Angus and (c) Aberdeenshire in the last year for which information is available.

Ross Finnie (22 September 2006): Estimated levels of carbon dioxide emissions for 2003 at local authority and regional level are available in a report entitled Local and Regional CO2 Emissions Estimates for 2003 produced for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). These experimental statistics present estimated emissions in a number of different ways, including totals by area, by sector and per capita.

A copy of the report is available on the Defra website at:

www.defra.gov.uk/environment/statistics/globatmos/


Housing

21 September 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) (Date Lodged 11 September 2006) : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of households in (a) Dundee and (b) Angus have a head of the household aged from (i) 16 to 29, (ii) 30 to 44, (iii) 45 to 59, (iv) 60 to 74, (v) 75 to 84 and (vi) over 85.

George Lyon : According to the latest household projections produced by the General Register Office for Scotland, the percentage of households headed by someone in each age group as at 30 June 2006 was:

Age Group

(a) Dundee

(b) Angus

16 to 29

16%

8%

30 to 44

25%

26%

45 to 59

25%

29%

60 to 74

20%

23%

75 to 84

10%

11%

85 and over

3%

3%

Total

100%

100%

(http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/statistics/library/household-estimates-projections/household-projections-for-scotland-2004-based/index.html, Tables 11-16).

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what the average household size is in (a) Dundee and (b) Angus.

George Lyon : According to the latest household projections produced by the General Register Office for Scotland, the average household size as at 30 June 2006 was (a) 2.02 in Dundee and (b) 2.20 in Angus.

(http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/statistics/library/household-estimates-projections/household-projections-for-scotland-2004-based/index.html, Tables 17).


Digital Technology

20 September 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) (Date Lodged 29 August 2006) : To ask the Scottish Executive what support it is giving cities to develop city-wide wi-fi networks.

Nicol Stephen : Wi-fi is a fast developing market and some Scottish cities are now seeing large scale networks deployed commercially. The Executive is not providing any financial support but is engaging with operators and local authorities and monitoring developments.


Care of elderly People

20 September 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what the hospital admission rates of elderly people as a result of falls have been in Dundee in each of the last three years for which information is available, broken down by postcode area.

Lewis Macdonald : Due to confidentiality issues associated with small numbers, the information requested has been presented by intermediate geography zone rather than postcode area in table 1.

Table 1. Hospital Admission Rates1 for Elderly2 Patients Admitted as a Result of Falls3 in Dundee4 ; by Intermediate Zones for the Time Period Ending 31 December 2003 to 31 December 2005

Intermediate Geography

Intermediate Geography

2003

2004

2005P

Description

Code

Number

Rate1

Number

Rate1

Number

Rate1

Dundee City  

583

22.6

642

24.9

585

22.7

Perth Road

S02000199

14

35.6

16

42.3

9

23.8

Westend

S02000200

12

12.8

14

15.0

26

27.9

City Centre

S02000201

17

33.5

13

25.0

6

11.5

Logie and Blackness

S02000202

18

18.8

32

33.9

25

26.5

Docks and Wellgate

S02000203

30

47.6

19

30.0

21

33.1

Balgay

S02000204

11

11.5

19

19.8

26

27.0

Menzieshill

S02000205

27

27.7

27

28.0

23

23.9

Broughty Ferry Wes

S02000206

27

20.1

29

21.0

32

23.2

Craigie and Craigiebank

S02000207

33

22.3

41

28.0

39

26.6

Stobswell

S02000208

14

29.3

15

30.7

15

30.7

Law

S02000209

20

16.4

35

29.6

32

27.0

West Ferry

S02000210

16

17.3

16

17.1

17

18.2

Hilltown

S02000211

40

35.0

46

40.8

26

23.1

Barnhill

S02000212

22

18.6

16

13.7

21

17.9

Broughty Ferry East

S02000213

25

29.8

17

20.2

19

22.5

Lochee

S02000214

39

29.3

23

17.8

27

20.9

Baxter Park

S02000215

8

14.0

9

15.8

12

21.1

Charleston

S02000216

16

19.4

24

29.7

14

17.3

The Glens

S02000217

20

17.7

30

27.4

26

23.7

Douglas East

S02000218

6

8.2

22

31.3

15

21.3

Fairmuir

S02000219

22

19.8

32

29.2

20

18.2

Western Edge

S02000220

11

35.7

7

20.9

11

32.8

Linlathen and Midcraigie

S02000221

22

31.1

25

35.6

12

17.1

Douglas West

S02000222

23

27.3

22

26.6

22

26.6

Caird Park

S02000223

5

10.5

9

19.0

10

21.1

West Pitkerro

S02000224

5

18.4

3

10.3

5

17.1

Ardler and St Marys

S02000225

30

33.8

24

26.2

33

36.1

Whitfield

S02000226

12

20.2

10

16.4

7

11.5

Downfield

S02000227

12

13.7

19

21.5

11

12.4

Kirkton

S02000228

5

12.0

10

23.0

8

18.4

Fintry

S02000229

21

27.9

18

23.5

15

19.6

Source: Scottish Morbidity Record SMR01 linked database – in-patient/day case discharge summaries from non-obstetric/non-psychiatric specialties.

PInformation for 2005 should be regarded as provisional.

Notes:

1. Rates are presented per 1,000 population.

2. Elderly patients are defined as those of age 65 years and over on admission to hospital.

3. Falls are defined from using the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision (ICD10) codes W00-W19, in any position.

4. Dundee is defined as Dundee City Council Area.


Diabetes

20 September 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) (Date Lodged 29 August 2006) : To ask the Scottish Executive what the hospital admission rates for diabetes have been in Dundee in each of the last three years for which information is available, broken down by postcode area.

Andy Kerr : The number of hospital admissions for which diabetes was recorded as the principle diagnosis is shown in table 1. Table 2 includes all hospital admissions for which diabetes was recorded as either a principle or a secondary diagnosis.

Due to confidentiality issues associated with small numbers, the information requested has been presented by intermediate geography zone rather than postcode area in the tables.

Table 1. Hospital Admission Rates1 for Patients Admitted for Diabetes2 in Dundee3; by Intermediate Zones for the Time Period Ending 31 December 2003 to 31 December 2005

Intermediate Geography4

Intermediate Geography

2003

2004

2005P

Description

Code

Number

Rate1

Number

Rate1

Number

Rate1

Dundee City  

105

0.7

140

1.0

138

1.0

Perth Road

S02000199

2

0.4

2

0.4

2

0.4

Westend

S02000200

3

0.5

1

0.2

2

0.3

City Centre

S02000201

10

2.1

8

1.7

4

0.8

Logie and Blackness

S02000202

4

0.8

3

0.6

5

1.0

Docks and Wellgate

S02000203

2

0.4

9

2.0

6

1.3

Balgay

S02000204

4

0.9

7

1.7

2

0.5

Menzieshill

S02000205

4

0.8

3

0.6

9

1.8

Broughty Ferry West

S02000206

9

1.8

7

1.4

4

0.8

Craigie and Craigiebank

S02000207

2

0.5

1

0.2

4

1.0

Stobswell

S02000208

6

1.3

4

0.9

5

1.1

Law

S02000209

3

0.8

2

0.5

6

1.6

West Ferry

S02000210

1

0.3

5

1.5

3

0.9

Hilltown

S02000211

5

0.9

4

0.7

2

0.3

Barnhill

S02000212

2

0.4

1

0.2

2

0.4

Broughty Ferry East

S02000213

0

0.0

4

1.0

1

0.2

Lochee

S02000214

7

1.3

2

0.4

3

0.5

Baxter Park

S02000215

5

1.5

4

1.2

2

0.6

Charleston

S02000216

3

0.7

2

0.5

3

0.7

The Glens

S02000217

2

0.4

4

0.8

9

1.9

Douglas East

S02000218

1

0.3

0

0.0

2

0.6

Fairmuir

S02000219

4

0.9

6

1.3

4

0.9

Western Edge

S02000220

1

0.3

1

0.3

0

0.0

Linlathen and Midcraigie

S02000221

5

1.0

12

2.3

11

2.1

Douglas West

S02000222

2

0.5

4

0.9

4

0.9

Caird Park

S02000223

1

0.3

1

0.3

4

1.1

West Pitkerro

S02000224

1

0.2

1

0.2

2

0.5

Ardler and St Marys

S02000225

5

0.9

11

2.1

9

1.7

Whitfield

S02000226

3

0.6

8

1.5

9

1.7

Downfield

S02000227

1

0.2

4

0.8

6

1.2

Kirkton

S02000228

6

1.5

7

1.7

9

2.2

Fintry

S02000229

1

0.2

12

2.2

4

0.7

 

Table 2. Hospital Admission Rates1 for People with Diabetes5 in Dundee3; by Intermediate Zones for the Time Period Ending 31 December 2003 to 31 December 2005

Intermediate Geography4

Intermediate Geography

2003

2004

2005P

Description

Code

Number

Rate1

Number

Rate1

Number

Rate1

Dundee City  

1556

10.9

1781

12.6

2086

14.7

Perth Road

S02000199

16

3.0

23

4.4

45

8.7

Westend

S02000200

30

4.8

23

3.6

27

4.2

City Centre

S02000201

32

6.6

27

5.4

36

7.2

Logie and Blackness

S02000202

48

9.2

48

9.5

62

12.3

Docks and Wellgate

S02000203

42

9.2

49

11.0

55

12.3

Balgay

S02000204

46

10.9

75

18.0

66

15.8

Menzieshill

S02000205

63

12.8

80

16.7

119

24.9

Broughty Ferry Wes

S02000206

59

11.6

71

13.7

71

13.7

Craigie and Craigiebank

S02000207

80

19.1

71

17.1

101

24.3

Stobswell

S02000208

48

10.2

58

12.0

73

15.1

Law

S02000209

60

15.8

58

15.4

89

23.6

West Ferry

S02000210

17

5.2

43

13.1

47

14.4

Hilltown

S02000211

65

11.2

63

10.8

62

10.6

Barnhill

S02000212

66

13.0

54

10.7

56

11.1

Broughty Ferry East

S02000213

31

7.7

55

14.0

48

12.2

Lochee

S02000214

82

14.8

133

24.7

105

19.5

Baxter Park

S02000215

41

12.3

44

13.3

57

17.2

Charleston

S02000216

51

12.5

55

13.9

49

12.4

The Glens

S02000217

88

18.4

81

17.3

123

26.3

Douglas East

S02000218

54

15.4

62

18.2

58

17.0

Fairmuir

S02000219

67

14.4

86

18.9

89

19.5

Western Edge

S02000220

11

3.6

15

4.9

14

4.5

Linlathen and Midcraigie

S02000221

59

11.3

71

13.6

87

16.7

Douglas West

S02000222

71

16.0

78

18.5

114

27.0

Caird Park

S02000223

32

9.1

46

13.4

52

15.1

West Pitkerro

S02000224

19

4.4

16

3.6

24

5.4

Ardler and St Marys

S02000225

80

15.1

80

15.1

106

20.0

Whitfield

S02000226

64

11.8

50

9.1

53

9.7

Downfield

S02000227

36

7.0

61

12.1

59

11.7

Kirkton

S02000228

39

9.7

42

10.8

69

17.7

Fintry

S02000229

59

10.8

63

11.7

70

13.0

Source: ISD Scotland. Scottish Morbidity Record SMR01 linked database – in-patient/day case discharge summaries from non-obstetric/non-psychiatric specialties.

PInformation for 2005 should be regarded as provisional.

Notes:

1. Rates are presented for number of hospital admissions per 1,000 population.

2. Diabetes in table 1 is defined using from the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision (ICD10), codes E10-E14 in the principal diagnostic position.

3. Dundee is defined as Dundee City Council Area.

4. The information for Dundee City in the tables are presented by "intermediate zone". These zones build on the well established postcode and census geographies and are now the key geographies for disseminating government statistics and for supporting policy making. Intermediate zones are designed to contain between 2,500 and 6,000 people and to fit within local authorities. For further information see Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics: Intermediate Geography Background Information (Scottish Executive, 2005) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/library5/society/snsigbi-00.asp.

5. Diabetes in table 2 is defined using from the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision (ICD10), codes E10-E14 in any position. Up to six diagnoses (one principle, five secondary) are recorded on the SMR01 returns. All six diagnoses have been used to select diabetes.


14 September 2006

Education

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive how many extra teachers have been employed in deprived areas since the allocation of the additional £62 million for this purpose and how it plans to monitor the impact of this funding on educational outcomes for pupils from these areas.

Peter Peacock :

The £62m of funding that has been made available to local authorities will be distributed on the basis of 80% GAE, 18% based on the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation and 2% based on rurality. Funds have been available from the start of this school year.

Teacher numbers are collected annually in the Teacher census and the results of the 2006 census will be available in due course.

My officials are to hold discussions with those authorities that are major beneficiaries from the additional funds for multiple deprivation on the outcomes that are expected.


11 September 2006

Population

Marlyn Glen : To ask the what information it has on the number of people who commute from Dundee to work and what percentage of the resident working population this represents.

George Lyon :

This information is available from the 2001 Census. There were 53,681 working people (excluding working students) who lived in the Dundee City council area, 6,324 (12 per cent) of whom worked outside Dundee City.

 

Marlyn Glen : To ask the what the latest available annual information is on the average age of (a) the population of Dundee and (b) those who have migrated to the city.

George Lyon:

At 30 June 2005 the average age of the population of Dundee City Council area was 40 years.

In the year to 30 June 2005, the average age of those migrating to Dundee City was 28 years. That figure does not include international migrants who do not meet the UN definition of someone who changes country of residence for 12 months or more.

 

Marlyn Glen : To ask the Scottish Executive what information it has on the number of people who commute to Dundee to work and what percentage of the Dundee working population this represents.

George Lyon :

This information is available from the 2001 Census. There were 66,663 people living in Scotland who worked in the Dundee City council area (excluding working students), 19,306 (29 per cent) of whom lived outside Dundee City.


7 September 2006

Dentistry

Marlyn Glen :  To ask the Scottish Executive how many NHS dental patients have been newly registered in NHS Tayside in the last year, broken down by month.

Lewis Macdonald : The information requested is provided in the following table.

Number of new NHS patient registrations. in NHS Tayside; April 2005 to March 2006

Month

No. of patients

April 2005

2,295

May 2005

2,262

June 2005

2,281

July 2005

1,743

August 2005

2,589

September 2005

2,833

October 2005

2,172

November 2005

2,395

December 2005

1,802

January 2006

2,253

February 2006

2,092

March 2006

2,283

Total

27,000

Notes

A new patient registration is a patient who was not registered with a dentist under NHS arrangements in NHS Tayside in the 12 months preceding each of months April 2005 to March 2006.


Teenage pregnancies

31 July 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of pregnancies were teenage pregnancies in (a) Dundee and (b) Angus in the most recent year for which figures are available, also broken down by postcode sector.

Answered by Lewis Macdonald : Due to the small numbers involved at postcode sector level, with the associated risk of disclosure, the following information is presented at postcode district level.

 

Teenage1 Conceptions2 as a Proportion of All Conceptions, Dundee City and Angus Council Areas by Postcode District: Year Ending December 20033

 

All Conceptions

Teenage Conceptions (%)

Angus

1,410

12.3

DD10

205

15.1

DD11

396

16.7

DD2

40

2.5

DD3

21

-

DD4

10

-

DD5

141

8.5

DD7

128

7.0

DD8

339

12.4

DD9

115

10.4

PH11

3

-

PH12

12

-

Dundee City

2,167

18.4

DD1

135

13.3

DD2

521

17.5

DD3

558

20.4

DD4

734

21.7

DD5

219

7.3

Source: ISD, Scotland, SMR01 and SMR02.

Notes:

1. Based on age 13 to 19 at time of conception.

2. Includes deliveries, spontaneous miscarriages and therapeutic abortions.

3. NHS Tayside have recently been experiencing difficulties in submitting SMR02 (maternity hospital records) to ISD, and the most recent data available for all pregnancies is calendar year 2003.


Dental Health

31 July 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of 11-year-olds within the NHS Tayside area showed no signs of dental disease in the most recent year for which figures are available.

Lewis Macdonald : The information requested is contained in table 5, page 11 of the 2005 National Dental Inspection Programme report at http://www.scottishdental.org/docs/ndip_scotland2005.pdf.

 

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of five-year-olds within the NHS Tayside area showed no signs of dental disease in the most recent year for which figures are available.

Lewis Macdonald : The information requested is contained in figure 1, page 6 and table 4, page 10 of the 2004 National Dental Inspection Programme report at: http://www.scottishdental.org/docs/ndip_scotland2004.pdf.

Occupational Segregation

31 July 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive when its cross-departmental working group on occupational segregation is due to report its findings and recommendations.

Malcolm Chisholm: The cross-departmental working group on occupational segregation is due to hold its first meeting towards the end of August. The life span of the working group will be no more than 18 months. It is envisaged that any final outputs from the deliberations of the group will be published as soon as possible after the conclusion of the group’s deliberations.

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab)  : To ask the Scottish Executive whether its cross-departmental working group on occupational segregation has met and agreed a plan of work.

Malcolm Chisholm : The first meeting of the cross-departmental working group on occupational segregation was scheduled for May 2006 but has been re-scheduled to August 2006 to enable the fullest attendance from senior officials. Terms of reference have been drafted but these have yet to be ratified. This will be done by the working group at its first meeting.


Dentistry

28 July 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many NHS dental patients have been de-registered in NHS Tayside in the last year, broken down by month.

Lewis Macdonald : The information provided in the table below shows NHS general dental service patients in NHS Tayside whose registration status indicates withdrawn. This records only one instance of mass de-registration in Tayside in 2005-06.

Number of general dental service patients in NHS Tayside whose registration status shows withdrawn1; April 2005 to March 2006

Month

Number of Patients

April 2005

24

May 2005

13

June 2005

9

July 2005

25

August 2005

18

September 2005

19

October 2005

14

November 2005

12

December 2005

6

January 2006

12

February 2006 2

2,993

March 2006

6

Total

3,151

Source: MIDAS (Management and Dental Accounting System).

Date extracted 13 July 2006.

Notes:

1. Based on patients whose registration status indicates “withdrawn” between the dates in question. This occurs when there is a request for the registration record to be withdrawn (made usually by the dentist, and subsequently approved by the NHS board). The numbers also include withdrawals carried out where more than one active registration exists for the same patient, as part of data cleansing. Some patients whose registration has been withdrawn may register with another NHS dentist elsewhere. There may also be retrospective additions to these data.

2. 2,962 patients whose status was withdrawn during February were deregistered by one single-handed practice.


Dentistry

28 July 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many dentists in NHS Tayside have left the NHS in each of the last three years, broken down by age group.

Lewis Macdonald : The number of dentists who left NHS Tayside1,2,3 in each of the last three years, broken down by age group, is as follows:

Age Group

Year

2003

2004

2005

Under 30

19

21

18

30 – 39

9

7

5

40 – 49

5

1

1

50 – 59

4

4

5

60 and over

6

3

6

Total

43

36

35

Source:

Management Information & Dental Accounting System (MIDAS).

Notes:

1. NHS dentists (general, community or hospital) who were registered to provide NHS treatment in Tayside at 30 September in one year, who were not registered to provide NHS treatment in Tayside at 30 September of the following year.

2. NHS dentists may cease providing NHS services on a temporary basis.

3. Some NHS dentists may have left NHS Tayside but still provide NHS services elsewhere in Scotland.


Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many general dental practitioners in NHS Tayside have (a) left and (b) joined the NHS in each of the last three years.

Lewis Macdonald : The information is provided in the following tables:

Number of general dental practitioners who left NHS Tayside1,2; 2003 to 2005

Year

2003

2004

2005

No. of dentists

30

22

27

Number of general dental practitioners who joined NHS Tayside3; 2003 to 2005

Year

2003

2004

2005

No. of dentists

26

29

32

Sources:

MIDAS (Management Information & Dental Accounting System).

MEDMAN (Medical and Dental Manpower Census).

Data extracted 12 July 2006.

Notes:

1. General dental practitioners (salaried & non-salaried) who had an open list number in NHS Tayside at 30 September one year, and who had no open list number in NHS Tayside at
30 September of the following year.

2. General dental practitioners may cease providing GDS on a temporary basis, or may move into a different sector (i.e. community or hospital).

3. General dental practitioners (salaried & non-salaried) who had an open list number in NHS Tayside at 30 September one year, and who had no open list numbers in NHS Tayside at 30 September of the previous year.

Some general dental practitioners may have stopped providing GDS in NHS Tayside’s area but still provide GDS elsewhere in Scotland or conversely may have been providing GDS elsewhere in Scotland before they joined NHS Tayside’s dental list.


Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many general dental practitioners in NHS Tayside were registered to provide treatment in each of the last three years.

Lewis Macdonald : The information requested can be found on the Scottish Health Statistics website via this link:
http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/files/D1_by_NHS_board_sep05.xls.


Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many dentists in NHS Tayside have (a) left and (b) joined the NHS in each of the last three years.

Lewis Macdonald : The number of dentists who left NHS Tayside1,2,3 in each of the last three years is as follows:

Year

2003

2004

2005

Number of Dentists

43

36

35

The number of dentists who joined NHS Tayside4,5 in each of the last three years is as follows:

Year

2003

2004

2005

Number of Dentists

39

43

43

Sources:

Management Information & Dental Accounting System (MIDAS).

Medical and Dental Manpower Census (MEDMAN).

Notes:

1. NHS Dentists (general, community or hospital) who were registered to provide NHS treatment in Tayside at 30 September in one year, who were not registered to provide NHS treatment in Tayside at 30 September of the following year.

2. Some NHS dentists may have left NHS Tayside but still provide NHS services elsewhere in Scotland.

3. NHS dentists may cease providing NHS services on a temporary basis.

4. NHS dentists who were registered to provide NHS treatment in Tayside at 30 September in one year, who were not registered to provide NHS treatment in Tayside at 30 September of the previous year.

5. Some NHS dentists may have been providing NHS services elsewhere in Scotland before they joined NHS Tayside.


Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many NHS dentists in NHS Tayside have been categorised as working in (a) general dental services, (b) hospital services, (c) community services and (d) more than one sector in each of the last three years.

Lewis Macdonald : The number of NHS dentists in NHS Tayside, categorised as working in general dental services, hospital dental services, community dental services and more than one sector, for each of the last three years is as follows:

Sector

20031

20041

20051,2

General Dental Services

178

185

208

Hospital Dental Services

68

66

66

Community Dental Services

24

25

27

More than one sector

13

12

28

All Dental Services3

257

264

273

Sources:

Management Information& Dental Accounting System (MIDAS).

Medical and Dental Manpower Census (MEDMAN).

Notes:

1. At 30 September.

2. Due to improvements in the collection of information on salaried dentists working in NHS General Dental Services (GDS), figures for 2005 include some GDS salaried dentists not previously recorded.

3. Total across all sectors takes into account those who work in more than one sector. Dentists who work in more than one sector have been subtracted from the total twice.


Vaccinations

25 July 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of two-year old children in the NHS Tayside area have received the MMR vaccine in each of the last four years for which figures are available.

Mr Andy Kerr : The information requested is published on the Scottish Health Statistics website at:

http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/files/child_imms_Tqtr106.xls.

Health

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many confirmed cases of measles there have been in the NHS Tayside area in each of the last four years for which figures are available.

Mr Andy Kerr : In the last four years (2005, 2004, 2003, 2002) there have been two confirmed cases of measles in Tayside. These were both in 2003 and comprised a family cluster of two adults. The initial case was imported from abroad and infection spread to one further family member. The cases were reported in the Scottish Centre for Infection and Environmental Health (SCIEH) Weekly Report Vaccine-preventable and childhood disease report of 10 June 2003.

The report is available online at:

www.show.scot.nhs.uk/scieh/PDF/pdf2003/0323.pdf.


Employment

26 July 2006

Marlyn Glen: To ask the how many people are employed at the (a) Scottish Social Services Council, (b) Scottish Commission for the Regulation of Care and (c) NHS Education Scotland offices in Dundee; how many of these jobs result directly from relocation, and how many are newly-created posts.

Lewis Macdonald :

The Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and the Scottish Commission for the Regulation of Care (the Care Commission) were new bodies established on 1 October 2001 and 1 April 2002 respectively under the Regulation of Care (Scotland) Act 2001.

8 employees transferred to SSSC from the Central Council for Education and Training in Social Work. The total establishment, at that time, was 32 Full Time equivalent (FTE) staff. The current establishment is 68.75 FTE and there are 71 employees.

419 employees transferred from Local Authorities and NHS Boards to the Care Commission. The total establishment, at that time, was 507 FTE. The current establishment is 589 FTE, including 20 FTE temporary posts. There are 565 employees. The Care Commission staff are employed across the Care Commission’s Headquarters and Regional and local offices.

NHS Education for Scotland (NES) was established in April 2002 as a Special Health Board with responsibility for supporting education for staff in the NHS in Scotland in order to improve the quality of patient care. It is located in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, Aberdeen and Inverness.

There are 60 staff in Dundee (44.21WTE) of which 13 are new posts resulting from the implementation of the Dental Action Plan. No new posts resulted from relocation.


Transport

26 July 2006

Marlyn Glen : To ask the in what way Transport Scotland will contribute to the specifications for future cross-border passenger rail service franchises.

Tavish Scott:

The Scottish Executive will consider the proposed specifications for cross border franchised services in relation to Scotland’s strategic requirements, and provide advice to the Department for Transport. In doing so we will consider:

Transport Scotland has the operational responsibility for this area, and can be contacted for more information if required


Life expectancy

25 July 2006

Marlyn Glen : To ask the what the latest available figures on life expectancy are in (a) Dundee and (b) Angus, broken down by postcode sector.

George Lyon

The most recent figures by postcode sector for Dundee and Angus, based on the 2001 Census, are available in the NHS Health Scotland’s Community Profiles, through the following link:

http://www.scotpho.org.uk/web/site/home/Comparativehealth/Profiles/CommunityProfiles/Tayside/Tayside.asp

Estimates of life expectancy for smaller areas are less reliable than those for larger areas. This is reflected in the confidence intervals (the range of values the actual value lies in, with 95% probability) that accompany the figures in the "graphs page" of the Profiles.


Health

Marlyn Glen :To ask the what percentage of two-year old children in the NHS Tayside area have received the MMR vaccine in each of the last four years for which figures are available.

Andy Kerr:

The information requested is published on the Scottish Health Statistics website under http://www.isdscotland.org/isd/files/child_imms_Tqtr106.xls.

 

Marlyn Glen : To ask the how many confirmed cases of measles there have been in the NHS Tayside area in each of the last four years for which figures are available.

Andy Kerr:

In the last four years (2005, 2004, 2003, 2002) there have been two confirmed cases of measles in Tayside. These were both in 2003 and comprised a family cluster of two adults. The initial case was imported from abroad and infection spread to one further family member. The cases were reported in the Scottish Centre for Infection and Environmental Health (SCIEH) Weekly Report Vaccine-preventable and childhood disease report of 10 June 2003.

The report is available online at www.show.scot.nhs.uk/scieh/PDF/pdf2003/0323.pdf.


Central Heating Programme

Marlyn Glen : To ask the how many homes in (a) Angus and (b) Aberdeenshire have benefited from the free central heating programme since 2001, broken down by housing sector.

Johann Lamont :

I have asked Angiolina Foster, Chief Executive of Communities Scotland to respond.

Her response is as follows:

"The information held by Eaga Partnership for the number of heating installations carried out under the Central Heating Programme in the private sector is only available at main postcode level. The number of properties which have benefited from the Central Heating Programme since 2001 to March 2006 is shown in Table 1:

Table 1

FINANCIAL YEAR

Postcode area : AB

Postcode area : DD

2001-2002

161

490

2002-2003

415

434

2003-2004

754

591

2004-2005

913

703

2005-06

936

589

TOTAL

3,179

2,807

The number of heating installations carried out by Local Authorities and Registered Social Landlords under the Central Heating Programme is shown in table 2:

Table 2

FINANCIAL YEAR

Aberdeenshire Council

Angus Council

2001-2002

0

12

2002-2003

0

0

2003-2004

2

180

2004-2005

0

0

TOTAL

2

192

The programme in these sectors was completed in 2004-05".


14 July 2006

Teachers

Marlyn Glen : To ask the how many teachers have retired on grounds of stress-related illness in each of the last three years.

Robert Brown:

Ill-health retirement has been approved for teachers who are members of the Scottish Teachers Superannuation Scheme in the last three years as detailed in the following table:

Year

Approved ill-health applications [stress]

03-04

88

04-05

80

05-06

47

 

Marlyn Glen: To ask the what percentage of the total number of working days lost by teachers was as a result of stress-related conditions in the most recent year for which figures are available.

Robert Brown:

This information is not held centrally. The management of teacher absence and the causes of absence are matters for individual local authorities as employers. However, Scottish local authorities are required by law to provide Audit Scotland with sickness absence levels among local government staff, including teachers. This information is not broken down into categories of illness.

The latest Audit Scotland Corporate Management Performance Indicator for 2004-05 compares the percentage of days lost through sickness absence by teachers with other local government employees. This shows that teachers, at 3.7%, had a lower percentage of days lost than Administrative, Professional, Technical and Clerical staff (5.5%) and Craft and Manual Workers (5.9%).

Marlyn Glen : To ask the how many working days were missed by teachers because of stress-related conditions in the most recent year for which figures are available, also broken down by local authority area.

Robert Brown :

This information is not held centrally.

Marlyn Glen : To ask the what the cost of sickness pay to teachers was in the most recent year for which figures are available.

Robert Brown :

This information is not held centrally.


Prescription Charges

28 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many prescriptions have been issued and what the cost has been of the drugs prescribed by GPs in NHS Tayside in each of the last three years.

Lewis Macdonald : The following table shows the number of prescription items and cost for prescription items issued by General Practitioners in NHS Tayside during the financial years ending 31 March 2004 to 2006 inclusive. Data given refer to prescriptions dispensed in the community, but do not take into account medicines dispensed by hospitals or hospital based clinics. The total cost given is that before addition of any pharmacy fees and deduction of any discount and patient charges.

 

Health Board

Financial Year

Number of Prescription Items

Gross Ingredient Cost

(£)

NHS Tayside

2003-04

5,372,173

72,010,934

NHS Tayside

2004-05

5,565,798

73,590,268

NHS Tayside

2005-06

5,757,661

76,568,748

 


NHS Finance

27 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how much has been spending on medicines in hospitals in NHS Tayside in each of the past three years.

Lewis Macdonald : The following table shows expenditure on medicines in hospitals in NHS Tayside for the latest three years for which figures are available. The figures include expenditure on drugs for hospital use (excluding radio-diagnostic x-ray drugs) and hospital prescriptions dispensed by community pharmacists.

 

NHS Board

Financial Year

£000

NHS Tayside

2002-03

14,876

NHS Tayside

2003-04

15,187

NHS Tayside

2004-05

16,723

 

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what the capital allocation to NHS Tayside has been in each year since 2003-04, expressed also at constant prices.

Andy Kerr : The formula capital allocation to NHS Tayside in each year since 2003-04 is as shown in the following table. The formula capital allocations have been deflated to show what they would have been if held at 2003-04 prices and these are as shown in the column of the table headed “Expressed at 2003-04 Constant Prices”. The GDP deflator which is produced by HM Treasury from data provided by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) was used in the calculation.

 

Year

Capital Allocation

(£000)

Expressed at 2003-04 Constant Prices

(£000)

2003-04

14,240

14,240

2004-05

15,445

15,113

2005-06

16,906

16,204

2006-07

20,276

18,971

2007-08

24,347

22,190

 


 

Digital Technology

27 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab)  : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of households have a broadband connection, broken down by parliamentary constituency and local authority area.

Nicol Stephen : This information is not held centrally.

 


Employment

27 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive for how many European language graduates the (a) business services, (b) wholesale and retail, (c) manufacturing, (d) banking and finance and (e) transport and communications sector was the first employment destination in the last three years for which information is available.

Nicol Stephen : Tables (a) to (e) show how many UK or EU domiciled full time higher education European language graduates from Scottish institutions took their first job (six months after graduation) in the specified industries in the UK.

 

(a) European Language Graduates: First Destination in Business Services

Academic Year

Estimated Number of First Destinations in the Industry

2001-02

65

2002-03

45

2003-04

55

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest five to protect confidentiality but all estimates are based on unrounded counts.

(b) European Language Graduates: First Destination Wholesale and Retail

Academic Year

Estimated Number of First Destinations in the Industry

2001-02

35

2002-03

60

2003-04

65

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest five to protect confidentiality but all estimates are based on unrounded counts.

(c) European Language Graduates: First Destination Manufacturing

Academic Year

Estimated Number of First Destinations in the Industry

2001-02

30

2002-03

45

2003-04

35

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC)

Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest five to protect confidentiality but all estimates are based on unrounded counts.

(d) European Language Graduates: First Destination Banking and Finance

Academic Year

Estimated Number of First Destinations in the Industry

2001-02

30

2002-03

30

2003-04

25

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest five to protect confidentiality but all estimates are based on unrounded counts.

e) European Language Graduates: First Destination Transport and Communications

Academic Year

Estimated Number of First Destinations in the Industry

2001-02

10

2002-03

15

2003-04

15

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest five to protect confidentiality but all estimates are based on unrounded counts.

The following table indicates how many UK or EU domiciled full time higher education European language graduates from Scottish institutions entered employment in the UK in all employment industries, in relation to the corresponding total number of European language graduates in that academic year.

European Language Graduates

Academic Year

Estimated Number of Graduates in Employment in UK

Total Number of Graduates

2001-02

215

455

2002-03

265

600

2003-04

285

590

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest five to protect confidentiality but all estimates are based on unrounded counts.

The data from the tables includes those graduating at sub degree, degree or postgraduate level in the given academic year. The information provided is the latest available.

Data on first employment destination of graduates is collected by means of a voluntary survey of UK and EU domiciled graduates around six months after graduation. Between 73% and 82% of full-time European language graduates responded to the survey in the three years. The estimates above assume that those not responding made the same employment choices as those responding.

 

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab)  : To ask the Scottish Executive what the employment rate after graduation was for students of (a) English, (b) mathematics, (c) science and (d) psychology in the last three years for which information is available.

Nicol Stephen : The following tables show the employment, unemployment and further study/training rates for full-time higher education students from the UK or the EU six months after graduation from Scottish institutions in the following subjects, for each of the last three years for which we have information.

 

The employment rates in the following tables are calculated as those entering any type of employment (permanent UK, temporary UK or overseas employment) within each subject group as a proportion of all those within the subject group who responded to the survey.

 (a) English

Academic Year

Graduate Destinations

Total

Employment Rate

Further Study/Training

Believed Unemployed

Other

2001-02

100.0%

55.4%

26.0%

8.1%

10.5%

2002-03

100.0%

53.7%

28.7%

8.5%

9.1%

2003-04

100.0%

53.9%

29.6%

6.3%

10.2%

 Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC)

“Other” destinations include those unable to work, looking after the home or family, taking time out in order to travel, etc.

(b) Mathematics

Academic Year

Graduate Destinations

Total

Employment Rate

Further Study/Training

Believed Unemployed

Other

2001-02

100.0%

58.2%

28.1%

5.0%

8.8%

2002-03

100.0%

59.6%

24.7%

9.3%

6.4%

2003-04

100.0%

58.2%

25.3%

8.4%

8.1%

 Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

“Other” destinations include those unable to work, looking after the home or family, taking time out in order to travel, etc.

(c) Science

Academic Year

Graduate Destinations

Total

Employment Rate

Further Study/Training

Believed Unemployed

Other

2001-02

100.0%

51.1%

32.7%

6.6%

9.6%

2002-03

100.0%

53.5%

30.2%

7.9%

8.4%

2003-04

100.0%

53.4%

31.9%

6.8%

7.8%

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

“Other” destinations include those unable to work, looking after the home or family, taking time out in order to travel, etc.

Note: In this table, science students include all students of the biological sciences and physical sciences (e.g. Chemistry and Physics).

(d) Psychology

Academic Year

Graduate Destinations

Total

Employment Rate

Further Study/Training

Believed Unemployed

Other

2001-02

100.0%

60.9%

20.0%

5.3%

13.9%

2002-03

100.0%

65.6%

19.9%

6.0%

8.5%

2003-04

100.0%

58.3%

27.4%

5.8%

8.5%

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

“Other” destinations include those unable to work, looking after the home or family, taking time out in order to travel, etc.

The data are collected by means of a voluntary survey of students and include those graduating at sub degree, degree or postgraduate level in the given academic year.

 

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab)  : To ask the Scottish Executive what the employment rate after graduation was for students of (a) French, (b) German, (c) Spanish, (d) Italian and (e) other European languages in the last three years for which information is available.

Nicol Stephen : The following tables show the employment, unemployment and further study/training rates for full-time higher education students from the UK or the EU six months after graduation from Scottish institutions in the following languages, for each of the last three years for which we have information.

 

The employment rates in the following tables are calculated as those entering any type of employment (permanent UK, temporary UK or overseas employment) within each language group as a proportion of all those within the language group who responded to the survey.

(a) French

Academic Year

Graduate Destinations

Total

Employment Rate

Further Study/Training

Believed Unemployed

Other

2001-02

100.0%

57.3%

23.8%

6.3%

12.6%

2002-03

100.0%

57.9%

31.1%

6.7%

4.3%

2003-04

100.0%

65.6%

22.9%

3.2%

8.3%

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

“Other” destinations include those unable to work, looking after the home or family, taking time out in order to travel, etc.

b) German

Academic Year

Graduate Destinations

Total

Employment Rate

Further Study/Training

Believed Unemployed

Other

2001-02

100.0%

72.2%

16.7%

5.6%

5.6%

2002-03

100.0%

49.3%

27.5%

17.4%

5.8%

2003-04

100.0%

70.2%

21.3%

0.0%

8.5%

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

“Other” destinations include those unable to work, looking after the home or family, taking time out in order to travel, etc.

(c) Spanish

Academic Year

Graduate Destinations

Total

Employment Rate

Further Study/Training

Believed Unemployed

Other

2001-02

100.0%

62.3%

17.4%

10.1%

10.1%

2002-03

100.0%

62.0%

25.0%

6.5%

6.5%

2003-04

100.0%

66.7%

17.1%

3.6%

12.6%

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

“Other” destinations include those unable to work, looking after the home or family, taking time out in order to travel, etc.

(d) Italian

Academic Year

Graduate Destinations

Total

Employment Rate

Further Study/Training

Believed Unemployed

Other

2001-02

100.0%

59.3%

29.6%

11.1%

0.0%

2002-03

100.0%

51.4%

28.6%

14.3%

5.7%

2003-04

100.0%

54.3%

17.1%

5.7%

22.9%

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

“Other” destinations include those unable to work, looking after the home or family, taking time out in order to travel, etc.

(e) Other European

Academic Year

Graduate Destinations

Total

Employment Rate

Further Study/Training

Believed Unemployed

Other

2001-02

100.0%

42.9%

40.5%

14.3%

2.4%

2002-03

100.0%

68.5%

21.5%

6.9%

3.1%

2003-04

100.0%

62.9%

19.0%

4.3%

13.8%

Sources: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

“Other” destinations include those unable to work, looking after the home or family, taking time out in order to travel, etc.

The data are collected by means of a voluntary survey of UK and EU domiciled students and include those graduating at sub-degree, degree or postgraduate level in the given academic year.


Health

26 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) (Date Lodged 16 June 2006) : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of drugs prescribed in NHS Tayside in each of the last three years have been generic drugs.

Lewis Macdonald : The following table shows the percentage of drugs prescribed generically in NHS Tayside during the financial years ending 31 March 2004 to 2006 inclusive. Data given refer to prescriptions dispensed in the community, but do not take into account medicines dispensed by hospitals or hospital based clinics.

 

Health Board

Financial Year

Percentage of Drugs Prescribed Generically

NHS Tayside

2003-04

82.0%

NHS Tayside

2004-05

82.5%

NHS Tayside

2005-06

82.9%

 


 

Physical Activity

23 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of the people within the 13 to16 year age range are estimated to carry out the minimum levels of physical activity recommended in Let's Make Scotland More Active.

Andy Kerr : In the Scottish Health Survey (SHS) children are classed as aged 15 and under.

In the most recent SHS in 2003, the percentage of boys in the 12 to 15 age range achieving the minimum recommended level of physical activity of 60 minutes per day was 68%.

The number of girls aged 12 to 15 meeting the recommendation was 41%.

Overall, the percentage of boys (aged two to 15) meeting the minimum level of activity increased from 72% in 1998 to 74% in 2003.

The percentage of girls (aged 12 to 15) meeting the recommendations also increased from 59% in 1998 to 63% in 2003.

Full results from the SHS 2003 can be viewed online at http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/11/25145024/50251.

 

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab)  : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of adults are estimated to carry out the minimum levels of physical activity recommended in Let's Make Scotland More Active.

Andy Kerr : Based on the results of the Scottish Health Survey (SHS) 2003, the percentage of adult males (aged 16 to 74) achieving the minimum recommended level of physical activity of 30 minutes per day increased from 41% in 1998 to 44% in 2003.

The percentage of adult women meeting the recommendations also increased from 30% in 1998 to 33% in 2003.

Full results from the SHS can be viewed online at http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/11/25145024/50251.

 


Nutrition

23 June 2006

 Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab)  : To ask the Scottish Executive what information it has on the proportion of adults who consume at least five portions of fruit and vegetables per day.

Andy Kerr (23 June 2006): The Scottish Health Survey (2003) [SHeS] has a large sample size and is the primary source of this data.

SHeS data on the proportion of adults consuming a minimum of five portions of fruit and vegetables per day shows that 20% of men and 22% of women consumed the recommended amount of five or more portions per day. The average number of portions consumed per day was three for men and 3.2 for women.

The SHeS data can also be analysed to show the fruit and vegetable consumption according to socio-economic factors. Both men and women in the most deprived areas consumed an average of two portions per day. While the daily intake in the most affluent areas was three portions for men and 3.5 portions for women.

Further comparative analysis of these figures can be found in the Scottish Health Survey which is available from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/17861/10352.

 


NHS Hospitals

22 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab)  : To ask the Scottish Executive how many people presented at accident and emergency departments in NHS Tayside in each of the last three years.

Andy Kerr :
The information requested is not held centrally. However, NHS Tayside has provided the information shown in the following table on total attendances at accident and emergency department in the years in question.

 

Hospital

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

Ninewells Hospital

48,158

48,687

47,818

Perth Royal Infirmary

24,472

24,391

25,460

Stracathro Hospital

766

 

 

Total

73,396

73,078

73,278

Note: Stracathro Hospital accident and emergency closed June 2003.


Justice

20 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many individuals in the Tayside police force area have had a charge proved in court for carrying a knife or being in possession of an offensive weapon in each of the last two years for which statistics are available.

Cathy Jamieson :
The available information is given in the following table.

 

Persons in the Tayside Police Force Area with a Charge Proved for Carrying Knives or Offensive Weapons1, 2003-04 and 2004-05

 

Possession of an Offensive Weapon2

Having in a Public Place an Article with a Blade or a Point

Total

2003-04

82

45

127

2004-05

90

74

164

Note:

1. Where main offence.

2. Knives cannot be identified separately from other types of offensive weapon in the data held for this crime category.


Relocation

19 June 2006

 

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive how many jobs in each Executive department, agency and non-departmental public body are currently being considered for relocation.

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive how many jobs have been created outside Edinburgh as a result of the relocation of staff in each Executive department, agency and non-departmental public body and how many of these are regarded as newly-created jobs.

George Lyon: The numbers of jobs located outside Edinburgh associated with each relocation of staff in each Executive department, agency and non-departmental public body are set out in a table on the Executive’s website. This can be accessed through the following link:

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Government/Relocation/StoryFar#a1.

Although many relocation projects will include a number of newly-created jobs, the majority of newly-created jobs will be associated with newly created organisations.

These include, in particular: Food Standards Agency, Public Guardian’s Office, Scottish Social Services Council, Scottish Commission for the Regulation of Care Headquarters, Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator, Mental Health Tribunal Service, Scottish Building Standards Agency and the Risk Management Authority.


Nutrition

19 June 2006

 

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive what research it is carrying out into the extent to which beneficial changes in eating habits are being achieved through the Hungry for Success programme.

Peter Peacock: The implementation of the Scottish Executive’s Hungry for Success initiative is being monitored by HM Inspectorate of Education.

Since August 2004, an inspection programme has been undertaken in primary and special schools which, by June 2006, will have seen 111 schools inspected. The inspection programme for secondary schools will begin in September 2006 and will run in conjunction with continued inspection of primary and special schools.

In March 2005, an evaluation of the Free Fruit in Schools Initiative was also carried out. The report of the evaluation is available at:  http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/12/21110322/03222.


Digital Technology

7 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what percentage of households had a domestic connection to the internet on the last date for which information is available, broken down by (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) socio-economic group.

George Lyon : The 2003-2004 Scottish Household Survey (SHS) report contains the most recent information on access to the internet. However, the survey does not provide data broken down by parliamentary constituency or by social class. Instead, helpful information is available in the 2003-04 SHS report which provides data on adult (home or other) access to the internet, broken down by local authority. This breakdown by local authority is available every two years, covering two year periods. The data for 2005-06 will be published in 2007. For reasons of representativeness, data for single years (e.g. 2003, 2005) can only be presented by the five largest local authorities and a further nine local authority groupings. Single year data for 2005 will be published in August.

An indication of household access is available at national level each quarter, broken down by household type, urban/rural classification and net annual household income (which is used as an indicator for the SHS instead of other socio-economic groupings).

This and other data on internet access and use from the 2003-2004 Scottish Household Survey Report can be found at:

www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/08/03155211/52413#620.

Alternatively, a copy of the report can be obtained from the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (Bib number 37213).


Languages

5 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what assistance it offers to businesses to develop European language skills among their employees.

Allan Wilson: The enterprise networks provide assistance to businesses on a wide range of issues, including information, advice and guidance on European language skills. Their websites provide access to resources such as free online courses in a variety of European languages from the BBC, advice from learndirect scotland on local language classes, and links to other organisations such as the Business Language Information Service.

 


 

Economy

5 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) (Date Lodged 18 May 2006) : To ask the Scottish Executive what the value was of Scottish exports to each other country within the European Union in the last year for which figures are available, also expressed as a percentage of the total value of Scottish exports to EU countries.


Nicol Stephen: The following table details the value and percentage of Scottish Exports to other countries within the European Union for 2004.

 

Table 1: Estimated Scottish Exports to EU countries, 2004

 

Estimated Value of Scottish Exports

(£ Million)

Estimated Percentage

All EU countries

8,825

100%

Netherlands

1,645

18.6%

Germany

1,600

18.1%

France

1,165

13.2%

Spain

775

8.8%

Eire

700

7.9%

Belgium

555

6.3%

Italy

525

5.9%

Sweden

380

4.3%

Denmark

325

3.7%

Finland

315

3.6%

Portugal

155

1.8%

Greece

150

1.7%

Poland

120

1.4%

Austria

110

1.2%

Czech Republic

95

1.1%

Hungary

90

1.0%

Lithuania

25

0.3%

Cyprus

20

0.2%

Luxembourg

20

0.2%

Slovakia

15

0.2%

Estonia

10

0.1%

Latvia

10

0.1%

Malta

10

0.1%

Slovenia

10

0.1%

Source: Scottish Executive: Global Connections Survey 2004.

Estimates are rounded to the nearest £5 million and exclude exports from some service sectors: air and water transport; financial intermediation; insurance and pension funding sewage and refuse disposal.


Health

1 June 2006

 Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab)  : To ask the Scottish Executive what the estimated average cost was of a first out-patient appointment at a consultant-led out-patient clinic in the last year for which figures are available.

Mr Andy Kerr : Cost information relating specifically to first out-patient appointments is not available.

However, the average cost of a consultant out-patient appointment, based on total attendances (i.e. first and follow-up appointments) is available. This equalled £98 per attendance in financial year 2004-05.

This includes activity and expenditure at consultation type clinics in addition to those which perform minor treatments and procedures.


Education

1 June 2006

 Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab)  : To ask the Scottish Executive how much has been spent under the Sure Start Scotland programme in (a) Dundee, (b) Angus and (c) Aberdeenshire since 1999.

Robert Brown : Since 1999, Dundee, Angus and Aberdeenshire have received £7,704,000; £4,420,000 and £8,939,000 respectively under the Sure Start Scotland programme.

Charities

1 June 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive how many people are employed by the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR) in Dundee; how many of these jobs have resulted from civil service dispersal, and how many new posts have been created as a result of locating OSCR in Dundee.

Johann Lamont : The Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR) currently employs 36 staff, all of them based in Dundee. Two of these jobs resulted from civil service dispersal – the posts were previously based in the Scottish Charities Office within the Crown Office. Thirty-four new posts have been created with the establishment of OSCR.

Financial Inclusion

31 May 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab)  : To ask the Scottish Executive what financial support it is providing this year to organisations offering financial literacy training.

Johann Lamont : In March 2005 we announced support for three separate financial education pilot projects totalling £1.4 million over two years, in partnership with Citizens Advice Scotland, Greater Easterhouse Money Advice Project and Young Scot. The aim of these projects was to allow individuals to increase their financial capability and make better informed decisions about which products best meet their needs.

 

From April this year we have provided £10.6 million funding to the 11 local authorities with the greatest concentration of financial exclusion and income deprivation – this will be spread over two years. Authorities will be able to utilise part of this funding towards financial literacy training.


Money Advice

19 May 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what information it has on how many money advisers there are in each local authority area.

Malcolm Chisholm : The following table gives the number of money advice posts paid for through Scottish Executive funding streams in each local authority area in 2005. Local authorities also fund money advice posts through their own revenue streams. Up-to-date information on such posts is not held centrally and they are not included in the table.

 

Full‑Time Equivalent Money Advice Posts Paid for Through Scottish Executive Funding Streams, 2005

Local Authority

Full‑Time Equivalent Money Advice Posts, 2005*

Aberdeen City

4.00

Aberdeenshire

3.80

Angus

3.43

Argyll and Bute

5.15

Clackmannanshire

3.00

Dumfries and Galloway

4.54

Dundee City

5.00

East Ayrshire

3.75

East Dunbartonshire

3.00

East Lothian

1.00

East Renfrewshire

1.00

Edinburgh City

9.00

Eilean Siar (Western Isles)

3.93

Falkirk

5.86

Fife

7.00

Glasgow City

34.00

Highland

2.22

Inverclyde

1.00

Midlothian

1.00

Moray

3.50

North Ayrshire

9.00

North Lanarkshire

16.50

Orkney Islands

1.00

Perth and Kinross

2.60

Renfrewshire

7.00

Scottish Borders

3.60

Shetland

2.30

South Ayrshire

2.40

South Lanarkshire

12.40

Stirling

4.00

West Dunbartonshire

2.25

West Lothian

2.50

Total

170.73

Note: *From Scottish Executive funding streams only.


Parent-Child contacts

18 May 2006 

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive  whether it will outline any recommendations arising from the research discussed at the seminar which it organised with the Economic and Social Research Council on 3 May 2006 on private arrangements for parent-child contacts.

Cathy Jamieson: This seminar was one in a series jointly hosted by the Executive and Social Research Council.

The seminar examined how other countries have experienced and researched private contract arrangements and how we might learn from this.

We are now considering how to take further work forward.  


4 May 2006

Water Mains (Improvements)

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive what plans there are to improve the infrastructure of water mains in Scotland.

The Deputy Minister for Environment and Rural Development (Rhona Brankin): On 28 September 2005, the Scottish Executive set out the objectives for improving the system that Scottish Water must meet in the next regulatory period of 2006 to 2010 and the objectives that Scottish Water should plan and prepare for in the period 2010 to 2014.

Scottish Water is preparing a delivery plan for 2006 to 2010, which will set out how it will deliver the Executive's objectives within the funds set by the Water Industry Commission for Scotland.

The plan will be submitted to ministers for approval.

Marlyn Glen: I thank the minister for outlining the position once again.

My concern about the state of parts of the water infrastructure has been renewed by a recent incident in Dundee—the water supply of 10,000 homes was cut off for nearly a whole day—and by the difficulties that Dundonians faced in getting any news of what was happening and in finding alternative supplies.

What plans are in place to improve the response to such emergencies in future, including plans to improve communications by perhaps making available a freephone number?

Rhona Brankin: I want to make it absolutely clear that the burst main in Dundee was caused by road contractors, working on behalf of Dundee City Council, who accidentally ruptured a major water main. It was not caused by dilapidated infrastructure or lack of investment.

It was a rupture of a large strategic water main that serves some 10,000 households across Dundee.

I believe that Scottish Water did all that it could to make the repair and restore services as quickly as possible.

I accept that issues may have arisen to do with communications from Scottish Water, and I understand that, following the incident, Scottish Water is to review its communications strategy and will try to determine whether there are other practical and beneficial communications routes that it can use.

Scottish Water would very much welcome suggestions from the local member.

If she is interested, I ask her to meet Scottish Water to discuss the issue so that she can make her suggestions in person.
 


20 April 2006

School Leavers

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive whether there are any plans to improve the tracking by local education authorities of the final educational destination of school leavers.

The Deputy Minister for Education and Young People (Robert Brown): Education authorities monitor the progress of their pupils in a way that most appropriately meets local needs.

Careers Scotland, working with education authorities and schools, collects information on the destinations of young people after they leave school.

The Executive will soon publish a strategy to reduce the proportion of young people who are not in education, employment or training—the NEET group—in Scotland.

The strategy will acknowledge the importance of having detailed information on young people's post-school destinations, and will recommend a number of actions to enhance the information that is available.

Marlyn Glen: I thank the minister for that detailed response.

The minister will be aware of the excellent links between Dundee City Council's education department and Dundee College, a further education establishment, and the resulting high transfer to higher education rate.

Does he agree that further education is an appropriate route to higher education and that movement through the sectors should be monitored and encouraged?

Does he also agree that all the successful career paths of young people, including into apprenticeships, should be measured and publicly acknowledged?

Robert Brown: I recognise immediately that there are several paths into higher education, one of which—an important one—Marlyn Glen referred to.

It is important that young people who do not make it to higher education the first time round through the main route should have on-going opportunities to get in.

The NEET group covers the 16 to 19 age group.

I readily accept that difficulties arise in analysing the composition of that group, which includes people who are doing gap years and various others who are not really at risk.

Difficulties also arise with the longitudinal or longer-scale approach of getting information on young people's situation later in life.

We are trying to get a better handle on the information that is available in following people through.

That is tricky and requires a lot of input, but we hope that over time and through the NEET group strategy, we will improve our understanding of that matter.

The problematic people with whom we are concerned are those who have a sustained status of being not in education, employment or training and those who move in and out of that situation over time.

We are not necessarily concerned with those who follow other routes or who take time out for other reasons.

 


30 March 2006

Vulnerable Children and Young People

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab):
To ask the Scottish Executive what progress has been made in respect of vulnerable children and young people since the publication of the Executive's 2003 reports, "Young Runaways" and "Sexual Exploitation through Prostitution".

The Deputy Minister for Education and Young People (Robert Brown):
As part of the three-year child protection reform programme that was launched in 2003, we have introduced a number of measures to protect vulnerable children and young people, including those who have run away or are sexually exploited.

Those measures include publishing the children's charter, introducing the framework for standards for all agencies, strengthening local child protection committees and introducing joint inspections of child protection services.

Furthermore, the "Vulnerable Children and Young People" guidance pack was published in July 2003 to guide agencies on this issue.

Marlyn Glen :
Has the Executive commissioned any research to gather statistical information on children and young people who are at risk or who are involved in sexual exploitation?

How many local authorities have followed the guidelines in the reports and have adopted protocols for supporting those young people?

Robert Brown : Marlyn Glen has raised a number of important issues.

The protocols to which she referred task local child protection committees with developing and monitoring local protocols on young runaways and children who have been sexually exploited through prostitution.

I am not sure that we have information on the number of local authorities that are following the guidelines, but I will write to the member on that matter.

Joint inspections will also produce a lot of information about the broad range of child protection services in this area.

An inspection is starting immediately in East Lothian, and a further eight will be instigated by the end of the year.

I am happy to ask the inspectors to take on board the question of whether local authorities have protocols and whether effective use is being made of them.

On research, the Executive provided funding to Barnardo's to undertake research into sexually exploited young people in secure accommodation, and a summary of its report was published last year.

However, I am happy to meet the member to discuss her concerns and give her a bit more detail on these matters.
 


20 March 2006

Apprenticeships

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive how many modern apprenticeships there have been in each year since the programme’s inception, broken down by gender and framework.

Allan Wilson: The number of modern apprentices (MAs) broken down by framework and gender each year since their inception is an operational matter for Scottish Enterprise and Highlands and Islands Enterprise. The information is not held centrally.

However, Scottish Enterprise have published MA figures for males and females in the top 12 frameworks since 1998-99, as well as the gender split for each framework by age groups 16 to 24 and over 25s for the year ending 31 March 2005.

These are available on the Scottish Enterprise website:
www.scottish-enterprise.com/sedotcom_home/training-providers-top/training-providers/performance-and-reports.htm.

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive what the completion rates for the modern apprenticeship programme were in (a) 2003-04 and (b) 2004-05 and what they are likely to be for 2005-06, broken down by gender and framework.

Allan Wilson: The overall modern apprenticeship (MA) completion rate in Scotland for 2003-04 was 48%. In 2004-05 the completion rate was 55%. The current completion rate is 60%.

Details about completion rates broken down by gender and framework is an operational matter for Scottish Enterprise and Highlands and Islands Enterprise. The information is not held centrally.

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive what steps it has taken to implement the recommendations of Jobs for the boys and girls: promoting a smart successful and equal Scotland published by the Equal Opportunities Commission in February 2005.

Allan Wilson: Officials were involved in the Equal Opportunities Commissions (EOC) External Advisory Group as part of their research into occupation segregation. I have met with the EOC since the launch of their investigative report into occupational segregation in modern apprenticeships (MAs), Jobs for the boys and girls: promoting a smart successful and equal Scotland.

I recognise that there are a complex set of factors which influence career choice and the Executive have agreed to set up a cross departmental working group on occupational segregation. Officials are currently liaising with the EOC Scotland over the remit, membership and duration of the group.

We have also, through the Modern Apprenticeship Implementation Group (MAIG), encouraged changes to the role of the group, the way it operates and also the process that MA frameworks are approved.

The process is now more robust and through Sector Skills Agreements we can encourage employers to become more proactive in tackling occupational segregation and share best


14 March 2006

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive  how many prosecutions brought under the Emergency Workers (Scotland) Act 2005 have been as a result of acts perpetrated against nurses or midwives.

Colin Boyd, QC: The Emergency Workers (Scotland) Act 2005 came into force in May 2005 and since then Procurators Fiscal have commenced prosecutions in respect of 90 charges under Section 5(1) of the Act which relates to the offence of assaulting or impeding health workers. 

It is not possible to extract information from the COPFS Case Management Database to determine how many reported charges in terms of the Act relate specifically to nurses or midwives. 

Note: This information has been extracted from the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service’s Case Management Database. The database is a live, operational database used to manage the processing of reports submitted to Procurators Fiscal by the police and other reporting agencies. The database is charge-based. The figure quoted therefore relates to the number of charges rather than the number of individuals charged or the number of incidents that gave rise to such charges.  


26 January 2006

Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive whether it has developed a timetable with the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and local authorities for the implementation of the waste electrical and electronic equipment directive and, if so, what the timetable is.

The Minister for Environment and Rural Development (Ross Finnie): We are working with the United Kingdom Government on further proposals for consultation and a final timetable for implementation of the waste electrical and electronic equipment directive across the UK.

Marlyn Glen: That answer gives me some measure of reassurance, but there is concern about the delay in the timetable.

Does the Scottish Executive plan to become involved in any monitoring and evaluation process once collection and recycling begins?

Ross Finnie: Obviously, that would be the case. The difficulty at the moment, as Marlyn Glen will be well aware, is that the WEEE directive places a burden on the manufacturer or the importer of the equipment. Clearly, it will be important for us to ensure that, once we have established an agreement to implement the directive, it does not fall on parties who should not be responsible. We must ensure that responsibility lies where the directive implies it should be.


Industry  23 December 2005

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what strategies are in place to reduce the dependency of manufacturing industry and employment on (a) military services and (b) the arms industry.
.

Nicol Stephen : There are no specific strategies in place to reduce the dependency of manufacturing industry and employment on military services and the arms industry.
The Executive’s enterprise strategy, A Smart, Successful Scotland, highlights areas for economic growth in the medium to long-term.


Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what geographic concentrations of dependency on (a) military services and (b) the arms industry
there are in respect of manufacturing industry and employment.

Nicol Stephen. : The are no figures currently available to show geographic concentrations of dependency on military services or the arms industry in respect of
manufacturing industry and employment.


Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what proportion of manufacturing industry and employment is dependent on (a) military services
and (b) the arms industry.

Nicol Stephen : There are no published figures available using standard industrial classification to show the proportion of manufacturing industry and employment dependant
on “military services” or “the arms industry” in Scotland. However, estimates relating to MOD expenditure in the UK broken down by standard industrial classification, and
dependent employment are available at the national level in tables 1.8a and 1.9 of UK Defence Statistics 2005 which can be found by accessing the attached web link
http://www.dasa.mod.uk/natstats/ukds/2005/ukds.html.

The latest published figures relate to 2003-04.

 


Civil Partnership (Scotland) Act 2004 22 December 2005

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab) : To ask the Scottish Executive what progress has been made in reviewing the consistency of wording between the Civil
Partnership (Scotland) Act 2004 and the Marriage (Scotland) Act 2002 in respect of the age of witnesses at both ceremonies.

George Lyon : While there is a difference in the wording of the relevant provisions relating to the age of witnesses, the effect is the same. Registrars will always ensure that witnesses to civil partnerships and marriages are 16 or over.


Public Services ( Access ) 22 December 2005

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive what measures are being taken to ensure access to public services for people whose first language is not English.

The Deputy Minister for Communities (Johann Lamont): Key public bodies including the Executive, local authorities, health boards and the police have a specific duty under race relations legislation to ensure access to the information and services that they provide, and must set out their arrangements for compliance in their race equality schemes. Updated race equality schemes were published last month. We have written to local authorities and other public bodies asking them to develop or improve language plans for the communities that they serve. We are also working to double the number of British Sign Language interpreters in Scotland to ensure that BSL users can access public services. We shall in the new year publish research into provision and quality of translation, interpreting and communication support services across Scotland. That research will help development of policy in that area.

Marlyn Glen: I thank the minister for that answer, particularly the detail on British Sign Language. The United Kingdom register of public service interpreters lists only 17 translators in Scotland. Can the minister say how many public authorities have access to services such as Language Line, which is a commercial telephone interpretation service? Given the importance of the issue, has the Executive considered drawing up and implementing a national translation and interpretation strategy to ensure that all public authorities have access to good-quality translation services?

Johann Lamont: The research that will be published early in the new year, which will consider how the support service is delivered throughout Scotland, will inform what we do next. We have emphasised to local authorities and public bodies their responsibility—they must have plans that identify local needs. Although we may later consider the gaps and how the Scottish Executive can provide support, the emphasis at this stage must be on local authorities and local bodies understanding local needs and taking responsibility for delivering services. However, I am keen to keep the issue under review and I am happy to give Marlyn Glen the specific information that she seeks about the quality of the service, and to explore further how imaginative and creative ways of addressing the issue can be taken on.


Forth Road Bridge Tolls

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): Although I accept the difficulties of congestion in Edinburgh and I hear what the minister is saying about consultation opportunities, I urge him to take into consideration the impact of the proposals for the Forth road bridge on Dundee and the surrounding areas in the north-east.

Tavish Scott: I accept Marlyn Glen's observations about the potential impact of those proposals and I am sure that she and many others will make representations on those matters, both in relation to ministers' decision-making responsibilities and in the ongoing consultation that I mentioned earlier.


Work - Life balance 21 November 2005

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive  what measures it is taking to encourage more employers in both the public and private sectors to promote practices in respect of work-life balance that benefit working parents caring for young children.

Robert Brown:  The Scottish Executive is in regular contact with the UK Government on work-life balance issues, including the recently introduced Work and Families Bill which will benefit working parents in Scotland.


Emergency Workers (Scotland) Act  3 November 2005

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive how many prosecutions have been brought under the Emergency Workers (Scotland) Act 2005.

Colin Boyd, QC: Since the introduction of the Emergency Workers (Scotland) Act 2005, Procurators Fiscal have commenced court proceedings in respect of 92 charges under that Act.   

Note : This information has been extracted from the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service’s Case Management Database. The database is a live, operational database used to manage the processing of reports submitted to Procurators Fiscal by the police and other reporting agencies. The database is charge-based. The figure quoted therefore relates to the number of charges rather than the number of individuals charged or the number of incidents that gave rise to such charges.


Residential Care 1 November 2005

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive what the latest available information is on the average weekly cost of the provision of residential care for a child.

Robert Brown: Average weekly costs of secure and non-secure residential care for a child need to be considered separately. The latest available information is as follows:

The average weekly cost of non-secure residential care for a child was £1,647 in the 2003-04 financial year.
The average weekly cost of secure residential care for a child was £3,458 in the 2004-05 financial year.


Emergency Services (Recruitment)  29 September 2005

Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab): To ask the Scottish Executive what steps can be taken to encourage more female and ethnic minority recruitment to the fire and police emergency services.

The Deputy Minister for Justice (Hugh Henry): The fire and rescue services have introduced multi-tier entry and accelerated promotion to attract a more diverse range of applicants. Although there is a long way to go, the number of female firefighters has tripled in the past 10 years. In the police service, the percentage of women increased from 11 per cent in 1995 to more than 21 per cent in 2005 and the percentage of officers from ethnic minorities increased from 0.3 per cent in 1996 to 1.2 per cent in 2004. We are providing direct financial assistance to SEMPERscotland, an ethnic minority support organisation that is working to improve recruitment, retention and community perceptions.

Marlyn Glen: Will the minister join me in welcoming the recommendations of an independent review into planning and race relations in Scotland? I urge that its recommendations be examined with a view to their being implemented throughout the uniformed services and ask whether that has been considered. Further, does the minister agree that the spotlight should then move on to retention, which he mentioned, and promotion opportunities for female and ethnic minority staff?

Hugh Henry: Any evidence that helps to advance the argument will be carefully examined. Marlyn Glen is right to mention retention: it is no success simply to recruit people in and then to lose them quickly. We want to ensure that when people join the uniformed services they are made welcome and that proper career development is provided and discussed. I want to see far more women and people from ethnic minority backgrounds advancing through the ranks of the police service and the fire service.


Dance 15 September 2005


Marlyn Glen (North East Scotland) (Lab):
To ask the Scottish Executive what progress has been made in promoting dance in Scotland

Patricia Ferguson: The Scottish Arts Council established a dance department in 2000.

The key aim of its strategy for dance is to encourage an environment that supports a wide range of high-quality dance activity with opportunities to create, perform, participate in and enjoy dance.

The Scottish Arts Council currently funds eight dance companies and organisations across Scotland.

Marlyn Glen: Does the minister agree that Dundee's contribution to the highly acclaimed performance of the Scottish Dance Theatre at the recent Edinburgh Festival is to be celebrated, particularly given the co-operation between Dundee College, the Scottish school of contemporary dance and the Dundee Rep?

Will she join me in praising Dundee's success as the centre of dance in Scotland?

Patricia Ferguson: I certainly share Marlyn Glen's sentiments.

The Space in Dundee, which is the home of the Scottish school of contemporary dance, is a facility that all MSPs should be very proud of, not least members who happen to represent the area.

It is worth noting that as little as 10 years ago there were no purpose-built buildings for dance in Scotland and we now have both Dance Base and The Space in Dundee as well as the other dance agencies throughout the country.
 

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